What is your biggest Cybertruck question you'd like answered by Tesla before committing to purchase?

lancethibault

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- I would like to know the FSD truth... how it transfers, or if can transfer, or if a model without FSD can acquire FSD in full or via monthly subscription. These answer effect whether or not I keep FSD when/if I make the purchase.
- Final range defined (does not include a + symbol. Will I be able to get 500 miles keeping the battery in the optimal SOC ranges? Meaning is the 100% charge actually equate to 580 miles of range.)
- Battery Size (Right now I'm assuming 200 KWH). The battery size with the actual range will help me determine how much it'll cost me to charge given the mileage I drive and in-turn how much I'll be saving in gas costs vs my ICE F150.
- Final specs (what's standard vs optional and how much do the options cost...i.e. 35" tires and how much effect will the options have on the range?)
- Final cost
- Cost to insure

Ultimately it's still a financial argument for me and there are still a lot of unknowns.
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Crissa

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- I would like to know the FSD truth... how it transfers, or if can transfer, or if a model without FSD can acquire FSD in full or via monthly subscription. These answer effect weather or not I keep FSD when/if I make the purchase.
We already have the answer to this. FSD currently attaches to the car until car is refurbished. FSD will be a available as a monthly, when it's available. All cars sold currently have the hardware (this wasn't true in the past).

- Final range defined (does not include a + symbol. Will I be able to get 500 miles keeping the battery in the optimal SOC ranges? Meaning is the 100% charge actually 580)
All range will be a variable. Your cargo, driving style temperature, speed, comfort levels will all change the range. Don't focus on it. The range given will be the range at ~35mph, not 70mph.

- Battery Size (Right now I'm assuming 200 KWH). The battery size with the actual range will help me determine how much it'll cost me to charge given the mileage I drive and in-turn how much I'll be saving in gas vs my ICE F150.
Battery size is irrelevant to cost to charge. You'd want Watt-hours per mile. It'll be between 350 and 500, depending again, upon driving conditions.

- Final cost
- Cost to insure
No one will know these until you get the papers to deliver, alas. And even then... they may vary after you get it by a few percent.

-Crissa
 

lancethibault

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All range will be a variable. Your cargo, driving style temperature, speed, comfort levels will all change the range. Don't focus on it. The range given will be the range at ~35mph, not 70mph.

Battery size is irrelevant to cost to charge. You'd want Watt-hours per mile. It'll be between 350 and 500, depending again, upon driving conditions.
Yes, but all MPG is also variable given cargo, driving style, speed, etc, but the manufactures still find a way to tell me their MPG and fuel tank capacity. I just want to know what the number means. 500+ doesn't mean much at this point.

I think I get what you are saying, but I still think battery size is relevant to driving cost. We maybe saying the same thing differently. If my electric rate to charge at home is $0.10/kwh and I deplete the battery from "full" (200kwh) to "half" (100kwh) after driving 250 miles then it's going to cost me $10 to fill back up. If the battery is a 300kwh pack and I deplete it to half after driving 250 miles then it's going to cost me $15 to fill up. My driving miles didn't change, but my cost to fill up did, so size does matter. Where am I wrong?
 

lancethibault

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We already have the answer to this. FSD currently attaches to the car until car is refurbished. FSD will be a available as a monthly, when it's available. All cars sold currently have the hardware (this wasn't true in the past).

No one will know these until you get the papers to deliver, alas. And even then... they may vary after you get it by a few percent.

-Crissa
FSD...good to know. I've seen some speculation on this but didn't know some of this was official from Tesla. Do we know the cost of the monthly subscription?

Why would cost vary after getting the final paperwork?
 

CyberG

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Yes, but all MPG is also variable given cargo, driving style, speed, etc, but the manufactures still find a way to tell me their MPG and fuel tank capacity. I just want to know what the number means. 500+ doesn't mean much at this point.

I think I get what you are saying, but I still think battery size is relevant to driving cost. We maybe saying the same thing differently. If my electric rate to charge at home is $0.10/kwh and I deplete the battery from "full" (200kwh) to "half" (100kwh) after driving 250 miles then it's going to cost me $10 to fill back up. If the battery is a 300kwh pack and I deplete it to half after driving 250 miles then it's going to cost me $15 to fill up. My driving miles didn't change, but my cost to fill up did, so size does matter. Where am I wrong?
I think Crissa’s point is that wh/mile is the most important number for determining how much electricity you will be using. It seems likely the battery pack on the tri motor would be around 200kwh. If Tesla can improve the wh/mile then a smaller pack would suffice. I generally get around 450 to 480 wh/mile in my 2013 p85+, but I drive like a moron. I’m sure I will drive slightly more normally when I get the cyber truck, but never underestimate the predictability of stupidity.
 

Sirfun

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Yes, but all MPG is also variable given cargo, driving style, speed, etc, but the manufactures still find a way to tell me their MPG and fuel tank capacity. I just want to know what the number means. 500+ doesn't mean much at this point.

I think I get what you are saying, but I still think battery size is relevant to driving cost. We maybe saying the same thing differently. If my electric rate to charge at home is $0.10/kwh and I deplete the battery from "full" (200kwh) to "half" (100kwh) after driving 250 miles then it's going to cost me $10 to fill back up. If the battery is a 300kwh pack and I deplete it to half after driving 250 miles then it's going to cost me $15 to fill up. My driving miles didn't change, but my cost to fill up did, so size does matter. Where am I wrong?
Size of Battery doesn't matter, just like size of the tank doesn't matter in ICE vehicles. What matters is MPG. In EV's it's miles/KWH. So to take your example, you went 2.5 miles per KWH. Which according to your example is 10 cents to go 2.5 miles. And yes that works out to $10 to go 250 miles. So your idea works it's just a little different.
Here's more info: https://www.edmunds.com/fuel-economy/decoding-electric-car-mpg.html
 

S1d3w1nd3r

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Will Tesla aggressively invest in the installation of new SC stations that will consider the CT’s size, trailers, and rural locations. I live in Alberta, Canada and charging infrastructure will limit the CT’s ability to charge in areas such as Edmonton, off the major transportation highways where infrastructure is currently installed, and rural highway corridors. I would like to see a expansion of SC’s along additional highway corridors, at truck stops, and in towns nearest to backcountry recreational areas. Tesla’s SC network is a major competitive advantage, but current locations do not meet the needs of a truck owner, IMO.
 

lancethibault

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Insurance isn't static, and neither is what options you add to the car ^-^

-Crissa
Insurance is a separate issue then the price of the truck. When I said final cost I was talking about final cost of the truck. Wouldn't the final paperwork include any added options? By the time I get my final paper work, I expect that to be the cost of the truck.
 

lancethibault

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Size of Battery doesn't matter, just like size of the tank doesn't matter in ICE vehicles. What matters is MPG. In EV's it's miles/KWH. So to take your example, you went 2.5 miles per KWH. Which according to your example is 10 cents to go 2.5 miles. And yes that works out to $10 to go 250 miles. So your idea works it's just a little different.
Here's more info: https://www.edmunds.com/fuel-economy/decoding-electric-car-mpg.html
Stating that the tank or pack size doesn't matter and then saying that what I stated works, feels a little trivial and still incorrect. You can't tell me the miles/kwh until you know the range and pack size...unless you have additional insider engineering info...or the EPA sticker telling you what the miles/kwh are.

The article you linked to even discusses this.

Range Rating
An estimated driving-range number also is a key part of the EPA sticker for EVs. In the case of the Focus EV, this is about 83 miles on a full charge of the car's 23 kWh battery pack.


The EPA label complicates things, though, by basing its calculations on the premise that because of various charging options, the typical EV will have only 90 percent of a full charge. Thus the range stated on the Focus EV's label is 76 miles.

So what is the 500+ based off...full charge or 90%?

This is exactly why I said
- Final range defined (does not include a + symbol. Will I be able to get 500 miles keeping the battery in the optimal SOC ranges? Meaning is the 100% charge actually equate to 580 miles of range.)
- Battery Size (Right now I'm assuming 200 KWH). The battery size with the actual range will help me determine how much it'll cost me to charge given the mileage I drive and in-turn how much I'll be saving in gas costs vs my ICE F150.

How much it is going to cost me to get go from 50% charge to 90% charge absolutely will be dependent on the size of the pack, not just the miles/kwh.

So I still don't see how someone can argue the size of the pack doesn't matter...unless that person is trying to make the argument that to drive 500 miles you don't have to do that on just one charge. Which is of course true, but maybe irrelevant for a person when they need that 500 range, hence the reason for them opting for the CT3.

And of course the article goes on to say,
Much like mpg, EV range can vary widely depending on how you drive. For the EPA range test, EVs are driven continuously on the combined city-highway cycle until the wheels stop.
 
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Will Tesla aggressively invest in the installation of new SC stations that will consider the CT’s size, trailers, and rural locations. I live in Alberta, Canada and charging infrastructure will limit the CT’s ability to charge in areas such as Edmonton, off the major transportation highways where infrastructure is currently installed, and rural highway corridors. I would like to see a expansion of SC’s along additional highway corridors, at truck stops, and in towns nearest to backcountry recreational areas. Tesla’s SC network is a major competitive advantage, but current locations do not meet the needs of a truck owner, IMO.
Most charging stations don’t work for trucks with trailers but some do already, for example: Seaside, OR has double pull thru charger sets, very doable if not full.
 

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Tri-motor towing range is my biggest question. Second is will there be Superchargers with trailer accessibility. Having to unhook to charge will be a pita but I'd probably just be slightly irritated and deal with it.
 
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Stating that the tank or pack size doesn't matter and then saying that what I stated works, feels a little trivial and still incorrect. You can't tell me the miles/kwh until you know the range and pack size...unless you have additional insider engineering info...or the EPA sticker telling you what the miles/kwh are.

The article you linked to even discusses this.

Range Rating
An estimated driving-range number also is a key part of the EPA sticker for EVs. In the case of the Focus EV, this is about 83 miles on a full charge of the car's 23 kWh battery pack.

The EPA label complicates things, though, by basing its calculations on the premise that because of various charging options, the typical EV will have only 90 percent of a full charge. Thus the range stated on the Focus EV's label is 76 miles.


So what is the 500+ based off...full charge or 90%?

This is exactly why I said
- Final range defined (does not include a + symbol. Will I be able to get 500 miles keeping the battery in the optimal SOC ranges? Meaning is the 100% charge actually equate to 580 miles of range.)
- Battery Size (Right now I'm assuming 200 KWH). The battery size with the actual range will help me determine how much it'll cost me to charge given the mileage I drive and in-turn how much I'll be saving in gas costs vs my ICE F150.

How much it is going to cost me to get go from 50% charge to 90% charge absolutely will be dependent on the size of the pack, not just the miles/kwh.

So I still don't see how someone can argue the size of the pack doesn't matter...unless that person is trying to make the argument that to drive 500 miles you don't have to do that on just one charge. Which is of course true, but maybe irrelevant for a person when they need that 500 range, hence the reason for them opting for the CT3.

And of course the article goes on to say,
Much like mpg, EV range can vary widely depending on how you drive. For the EPA range test, EVs are driven continuously on the combined city-highway cycle until the wheels stop.
Please never ever expect to go the full range of your battery. There needs to be some buffer above and below. As some are saying, range is your usage per mile x the watts remaining - a safe % at the bottom. I recently started part full with 205 miles of estimated range, drove 136 miles to the next chargers, and had only 3 miles remaining, at reduced speeds! It was cold and raining so the car quickly told me my watts usage was too high to make that distance at that speed. I slowed to what it said and made it. Never ever assume you will ever go 500 miles when the rating is for 500.
 

CyberG

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And just to clarify the last couple of posts, the rated range is battery at 100% under ideal conditions. As mentioned unless you are going on a perfectly flat road in 73 degree windless conditions you won’t get the rated range. You shouldn’t expect it nor rely on it. Every little thing makes a difference, which is why the Model 3 has those ugly wheel covers that everyone takes off. It’s all about the range. The minimal extra cost in electricity usually doesn’t make up for driving a great looking car with hideous wheel covers. But if range is your number 1 concern then you will want to get the truck with the most efficient wheels, drive like Miss Daisy, and keep the AC to a minimum, etc. I have solar so I just don’t care all that much, however I do like having the ability to take road trips with the kids so I want the longest range truck. 500 miles rated range hopefully will get me to Mammoth in one sitting.
 

Crissa

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Insurance is a separate issue then the price of the truck. When I said final cost I was talking about final cost of the truck. Wouldn't the final paperwork include any added options? By the time I get my final paper work, I expect that to be the cost of the truck.
Tesla allows your to digitally unlock options.

And I couldn't tell if you meant TCO or whatever. ^-^

...for example: Seaside, OR has double pull thru charger sets, very doable if not full.
Now if only they'd add some chargers in Coos Bay and Newport. There's not quite enough to do a completely loose trip up the coast yet ^-^ Gotta make an overnight as a specific location right now.

-Crssa
 
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