Yoke Steering Wheel in S, X Cybertruck. NHTSA says, ‘What you talking ‘bout, Elon?!”

Luke42

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Citroens could not be imported to N. America because the yellow color of the turn-signal lights violated some stipulation that they had to be white. Then it was realized that the yellow helped differentiat
These days, matching different standards for different markets (homologation) is just another engineering constraint. It's a big deal in the auto industry.

The cost of engineering a product for multiple markets can kill some products for some markets, though, because the extra sales might not be worth the extra engineering and manufacturing costs.

The homologation costs are why we don't see, for instance, Australian utes (think El Camino with a big engine) here in the US market -- even though there are a few Americans who would really love to buy these vehicles if they were available.

A lot of these automotive standards are protectionist measures, also known as non tariff [trade] barriers (NTBs). In practice it makes the global auto market less competitive, and reduces product-choice -- but has likely kept GM from going bankrupt more than once...
 

Stuck4ger

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I seriously doubt joysticks will ever be a think for cars. The input is too sloppy compared to the maneuvers you'll want to do. Plotting a course on a touch screen would be far better integration to the AI.

-Crissa
That's not what the Blue Angels think :)
 

Crissa

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That's not what the Blue Angels think :)
The Blue Angels don't use joysticks to trim their aileron. Nor do they do three point turns only with the collective. They have pedals and trim dials and even then, they wouldn't be able to run their planes down the Dragon's Tail.

-Crissa
 

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These days, matching different standards for different markets (homologation) is just another engineering constraint. It's a big deal in the auto industry.

The cost of engineering a product for multiple markets can kill some products for some markets, though, because the extra sales might not be worth the extra engineering and manufacturing costs.

The homologation costs are why we don't see, for instance, Australian utes (think El Camino with a big engine) here in the US market -- even though there are a few Americans who would really love to buy these vehicles if they were available.

A lot of these automotive standards are protectionist measures, also known as non tariff [trade] barriers (NTBs). In practice it makes the global auto market less competitive, and reduces product-choice -- but has likely kept GM from going bankrupt more than once...
I can imagine the Volkswagen Group spending millions in Brussels EU HQ these days on “truck safety” to make sure the Cybertruck narrowly does not pass EU regulations while perhaps their own future electric Amarok will. I can see why Tesla wouldn’t bother with that when the main truck market is at home anyway. Of course I hope I’m wrong and that the EU bodies stay sane. I’m getting one anyway. It’s not like they will be able to stop or catch up to my unregistered CT on the road or off-road.😀 I could keep it up the valley at the closest small railroad station to the cabin. Anyway, rambling, I hope we’ll keep cheering on each other’s EV tech rather than protect car markets like we used to.
 

Stuck4ger

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The Blue Angels don't use joysticks to trim their aileron. Nor do they do three point turns only with the collective. They have pedals and trim dials and even then, they wouldn't be able to run their planes down the Dragon's Tail.

-Crissa
Well you're right about that, since I don't think they have ever done three-point turns in their routine and they have never had a collective since they, uh, fly jets, not helos.
 
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Crissa

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Well you're right about that, since I don't think they have ever done three-point turns in their routine and they have never had a collective since they, uh, fly jets, not helos.
The stick in a modern military aircraft is always a collective because it's fly-by-wire and controls multiple variables at once. These aren't barn-stormers.

I might be coming at this from an engineering point of view, I went to school for aeronautical engineering, not aeronautics. That was my roommate (who had the habit of killing my alarm, darnit.)

-Crissa
 

Stuck4ger

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The stick in a modern military aircraft is always a collective because it's fly-by-wire and controls multiple variables at once. These aren't barn-stormers.

I might be coming at this from an engineering point of view, I went to school for aeronautical engineering, not aeronautics. That was my roommate (who had the habit of killing my alarm, darnit.)

-Crissa
The stick in a rotary wing aircraft is almost always a collective. [EDIT - the control stick is a cyclic, the "throttle stick" is the collective.] The stick in a fixed-wing aircraft (modern fly-by-wire or not) is never referred to as a collective. At least not in any of the couple of hundred different types that I've flown.
 
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happy intruder

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The stick in a rotary wing aircraft is almost always a collective. The stick in a fixed-wing aircraft (modern fly-by-wire or not) is never referred to as a collective. At least not in any of the couple of hundred different types that I've flown.
I flew for over 20 years in the Marine Corps....A6, F4, OV-10, A4 and C-12....I never had the opportunity to find the collective.....I just had issues with ordnance putting my bombs on backwards......we did zero G hi-loft bomb delivery......😂
 

Luke42

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That's not what the Blue Angels think :)
I do formation-flying in an aircraft with a stick every chance I get (glider pilot), but I don't think I'd find the stick intuitive for a car. The stick controls roll and pitch, not yaw and power.

Same with the yoke, really.

I prefer to use car controls in my car, and airplane controls in my airplane.
 

Luke42

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The stick in a rotary wing aircraft is almost always a collective. The stick in a fixed-wing aircraft (modern fly-by-wire or not) is never referred to as a collective. At least not in any of the couple of hundred different types that I've flown.
Not quite.

The cyclic is the stick which controls pitch and roll, and the collective is the "go up" lever. Also, the pedals control yaw. Or at least these controls control these axes as much as you can control one axis independently on flying gyroscope and giant ceiling fan with variable pitch blades -- I hear you have to use all of the controls together to maintain control of a helicopter.

I'm only qualified to fly GA aircraft and gliders, though, and I'm not a helicopter pilot -- so listen to this professional heli flight instructor instead of me:
 

Stuck4ger

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Not quite.

The cyclic is the stick which controls pitch and roll, and the collective is the "go up" lever. Also, the pedals control yaw. Or at least these controls control these axes as much as you can control one axis independently on flying gyroscope and giant ceiling fan with variable pitch blades -- I hear you have to use all of the controls together to maintain control of a helicopter.

I'm only qualified to fly GA aircraft and gliders, though, and I'm not a helicopter pilot -- so listen to this professional heli flight instructor instead of me:

Argh, I knew that and can’t believe I made that brain fart (well, maybe I can). The left stick in a helo is the collective. I’m blaming Crissa for throwing me off with all her collective references 🤪
 

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Speaking of «collective»; That was an interesting and wholesome *collective* short explanation for someone not versed in aero at all. I’m in trains and there’s barely a throttle. 😂 Cheers, Cybercollective 😊
 

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I do formation-flying in an aircraft with a stick every chance I get (glider pilot), but I don't think I'd find the stick intuitive for a car. The stick controls roll and pitch, not yaw and power.

Same with the yoke, really.

I prefer to use car controls in my car, and airplane controls in my airplane.
Yes, I really have to think about what left and right stick does if I haven't flown my drone for awhile but I'm pretty sure that I wouldn't expect the CT to bank! If you were replacing a steering wheel with a steer-by-wire joystick, then that stick could be more like a space shuttle rotational hand controller where you twist for a flat turn.
 

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Speaking of «collective»; That was an interesting and wholesome *collective* short explanation for someone not versed in aero at all. I’m in trains and there’s barely a throttle. 😂 Cheers, Cybercollective 😊
Oh yeah, now get us all on a throttle discussion!
 

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