Prime8

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Looks like that's the Model 3 Highland too
 

Ogre

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Less useful for powering a fridge in motion.

I really don't like this solution.

-Crissa
Oh.. I do think it needs fixed 110v plugs too. But you don’t need 15 outlets in use while in motion.
 

Coolbreeze704

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Coolbreeze704

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Ok, let me throw some technicalities out here and rain on someone’s parade.

”…has enough power to…” The devil is in the details. Note that it doesn’t say it CAN, just that it has enough power. A Model S has ”enough power” to charge a 3 or Y, but it can’t. I’m not saying the CT can’t or won’t, I’m just saying careful what you read into things.

I hope it can, then you just need one charging dock at home. Plug the CT into the dock, and then connect your “other Tesla” into the CT. Kind of a daisy chain idea there.
 

Tinker71

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Technically I can charge a Tesla from my VW electric bus. I have a 4 kWhr 22VDC battery that drives an inverter that I can plug my level 1 charge cable into. Not the most efficient but it works.
 


HaulingAss

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So now I am curious. Is the charge controller in the vehicle which basically takes as much power as it can from the power source. Or is the charge controller in the charger and the vehicle tells it how much to supply. I have installed 6 Tesla chargers and they are super simple compared to say a solar inverter which is handling a similar amount of power with similar power conversion. So it would be interesting to know which smarts are in the car vs charger. Obviously if it V2V charging, the smarts will need to be in the car. So would you literally just need a special wire with a Tesla connector on each end.
Let's not make this more complicated than it is:

Elon has already disclosed the Cybertruck will have 120V and 240V power outlets. Just plug a Mobile Connector into the 240V outlet and into the EV you want to charge. The Mobile Connector tells the car what type of outlet it's plugged into (based upon the type of outlet adapter plugged into the Mobile Connector) and the car limits it's current draw to the amount appropriate for that kind of outlet.

The car will further limit amperage if it detects too much voltage sag, too much heat at the charge port, or the Mobile connector tells it there is an overheat condition in the outlet or elsewhere in the Mobile connector.

It would be more efficient if there were a DC to DC charge capability but I've seen no indication of that.
 

anionic1

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Let's not make this more complicated than it is:

Elon has already disclosed the Cybertruck will have 120V and 240V power outlets. Just plug a Mobile Connector into the 240V outlet and into the EV you want to charge. The Mobile Connector tells the car what type of outlet it's plugged into (based upon the type of outlet adapter plugged into the Mobile Connector) and the car limits it's current draw to the amount appropriate for that kind of outlet.

The car will further limit amperage if it detects too much voltage sag, too much heat at the charge port, or the Mobile connector tells it there is an overheat condition in the outlet or elsewhere in the Mobile connector.

It would be more efficient if there were a DC to DC charge capability but I've seen no indication of that.
That would be about the least innovative way they could do this, but I guess really it’s for emergency purposes. So maybe 20 or 30 miles of charge in an hour would be all that’s really needed.
 

HaulingAss

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That would be about the least innovative way they could do this, but I guess really it’s for emergency purposes. So maybe 20 or 30 miles of charge in an hour would be all that’s really needed.
I don't think it's about innovation, it's about value and how much extra the feature costs to add. And how much additional value would be added by not having to use the already existing Mobile Connector and 240V AC outlet, vs. whatever would be required of the internal electronics and software to enable a dedicated port to port DC charging system and having a dedicated cable only for this application, a cable that would likely cost almost as much as a Mobile Connector, which many already have and that is more useful for other purposes.

Sure, it would be cool, I just don't see many people forking out $200 for the cable when the MC would already work if someone needed V2V in the wild.
Sponsored

 
 




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