VolklKatana

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I don't want to incur the wrath of all you gear heads out there but I see a problem when 500K CTs hit the streets. It is pretty common to see a car hanging out of the 4th floor of a parking garage or through the window of a coffee shop or whatever. How far will a CT travel in the fraction of a second that it takes to move your foot from the "gas" pedal to the brake? Might it not be a good idea to have a button that you have to push to get that incredible acceleration. Maybe the vehicle should default to an economy mode unless you tell it not to. Sports car acceleration in a 2 ton 4 wheel drive monster is a whole new ball game and a lot of the people with the means to buy a CT don't have the reflexes to handle one. (at 76 when my truck arrives, that probably includes me)
here comes the wrath!!!...

As with ludicrous mode in other tesla vehicles, Im sure it will be an opt in performance boost. As everyone knows, its a party favor, not a useful everyday driving feature.

But I sure as hell cant wait to use it every day!!! 😈
 

mrbulk

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I was just thinking about the power level selection thing.

I truly want always-on, full-power accessibility like the Performance Model 3 and Y have, where you just stomp the go pedal to Go.
Not like Ludicrous Mode in the Models S and X where you have a certain protocol to follow, wait for battery warmup, etc.

Please Elon, we want I.G. (Instant Go)!!!
 

fritter63

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Maybe the vehicle should default to an economy mode unless you tell it not to. Sports car acceleration in a 2 ton 4 wheel drive monster is a whole new ball game and a lot of the people with the means to buy a CT don't have the reflexes to handle one. (at 76 when my truck arrives, that probably includes me)
yeah, was thinking the same. Maybe we need an "inverse ludicrous" setting....
 

Bigvbear

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i could care less about rocket speed. i just want the longest range battery in the most affordable trim.
^^^ THIS ^^^

I think you will find most pickup truck buyers don't by for speed, but for hauling capacity, towing capacity, and utility.
 

ajdelange

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I think you will find most pickup truck buyers don't by for speed, but for hauling capacity, towing capacity, and utility.
Those things require high torque, high power and a big battery (for reasonable range while towing). When one is not towing or hauling a heavy load high torque, high power and a big battery confer unbelievable acceleration, speed and driving range.
 

Humanoid1

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Although Cybertruck clearly has the power/torque to make it's relatively high gear ratio work great for day to day driving just like works so well in the rest of the range, it does not work so well for low speed off roading up a steep rough track. It can do it well (will certainly make it up), but it is inefficient and sucks a lot of power. A possible crawler gear would make it more efficient in these scenarios as well as more controllable while the truck is bounced around over big rocks etc
I am hoping that the Cybertruck is the first Tesla with more than one gear.
What do you guys think?

Youtube channel The Fast Lane Car took a Model X offroad and noted the higher than expected power drain. Being a Model X it was a fairly tame uphill but still consumed an avg 1546wh per mile!
 
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Mini2nut

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  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
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Tesla needs to offer a lower HP “valet” option that you can lock out via the touch screen. Dodge offered this option on the limited edition Dodge Demon.
 

Alan

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Tesla needs to offer a lower HP “valet” option that you can lock out via the touch screen. Dodge offered this option on the limited edition Dodge Demon.
That’s part of the system for current Tesla s. You can chose to lock it to any top speed from the car or with your phone app.
 

ajdelange

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Although Cybertruck clearly has the power/torque to make it's relatively high gear ratio work great for day to day driving just like works so well in the rest of the range, it does not work so well for low speed off roading up a steep rough track. It can do it well (will certainly make it up), but it is inefficient and sucks a lot of power....
What do you guys think?
I think you should obtain and read a book about electric motors with emphasis on their torque and efficiency characteristics at low speed.

Youtube channel The Fast Lane Car took a Model X offroad and noted the higher than expected power drain. Being a Model X it was a fairly tame uphill but still consumed an avg 1546wh per mile!
I think you should obtain and read a basic physics text. An X weighs about 2500 kg. To raise it 1 meter requires 2500*9.8*1 = 2450 joules = 6.8 Wh. To drive 1 mile (1600 m) on a 15% grade means going up hill 240 m. The energy required is 240*6.8 = 1633 Wh. Thus 1546 Wh/mile isn't a reflection on the efficiency of the motors but rather on the simple physics of how much energy must be expended to combat the force of gravity. As an electric motor has full torque down to 0 rpm there would be no advantage to a lower gear. To raise the car 1 m still takes 6.8 Wh.

Further to this: if you take a 100 mile road trip in your X on level ground you would expect to use about 27 kWh i.e. about 27% of your battery. If you were driving into the mountains and you destination was a mile higher that your departure point you would use an additional 11 kWh i.e. approximately 11% more just to get the car up the hill! Maybe that's worth of an exclamation point. Going up hill takes a lot of energy! The good news with a BEV is, of course, that you get fair amount of that energy back when you come back down the hill. I have made drives in which the SoC at the destination was actually a couple of percent higher than it was at the departure point.

If you are going to go uphill at crawl or at cruise speed it is going to require lots of energy. But you will probably not be increasing your elevation by as much as a mile once you get out in the woods. Thus you will not use more than a few % of your battery. Getting to the woods, conversely, may take you up a mile costing 10% or more of your battery and you need need to know how to incorporate that into your trip planning.
 
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Eye of Elon

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It won't allow you to do that. If it detects a barrier in front of the vehicle won't matter if you stomp it, it won't move and you'll get an alarm sound in car. Some fun examples of model 3s where they put a cardboard box in front of car and try to stomp it. Car barely budges.
If it has the sensors for full self driving, it should be pretty easy to keep it from accelerating into objects up front. However, I hope the safety features don't prevent us from driving through brush and branches on barely maintained logging roads.
 

Humanoid1

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I think you should obtain and read a book about electric motors with emphasis on their torque and efficiency charscteristics at low speed.

I think you should obtain and read a basic physics text. An X weighs about 2500 kg. To raise it 1 meter requires 2500*9.8*1 = 2450 joules = 6.8 Wh. To drive 1 mile (1600 m) on a 15% grade means going up hill 240 m. The energy required is 240*6.8 = 1633 Wh. Thus 1546 Wh/mile isn't a reflection on the efficiency of the motors but rather on the simple physics of how much energy must be expended to combat the force of gravity. As an electric motor has full torque down to 0 rpm there would be no advantage to a lower gear. To raise the car 1 m still takes 6.8 Wh.

Further to this: if you take a 100 mile road trip in your X on level ground you would expect to use about 27 kWh i.e. about 27% of your battery. If you were driving into the mountains and you destination was a mile higher that your departure point you would use an additional 11 kWh i.e. approximately 11% more just to get the car up the hill! Maybe that's worth of an exclamation point. Going up hill takes a lot of energy! The good news with a BEV is, of course, that you get fair amount of that energy back when you come back down the hill. I have made drives in which the SoC at the destination was actually a couple of percent higher than it was at the departure point.

If you are going to go uphill at crawl or at cruise speed it is going to require lots of energy. But you will probably not be increasing your elevation by as much as a mile once you get out in the woods. Thus you will not use more than a few % of your battery. Getting to the woods, conversely, may take you up a mile costing 10% or more of your battery and you need need to know how to incorporate that into your trip planning.
Thanks for your response, I would love to give a proper reply now but have to prepare for a big shopping mission for a couple of families.
I might remind you though that although electric motors have peak torque at 0 rpm, their peak efficiency if often at a much higher rpm, perhaps at say 90% of its rated rpm.

main-qimg-fcf541de83bd871b9ba92ddf643fb09c.gif


Our legs are a little like an electric motor in this regard and we all know how much easier going up a steep hill is in a lower gear with higher rpm while riding a bicycle.

I will enjoy getting deeper into the numbers with you later. Have a great day :)
 
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