Poll : What would be the perfect model for you

What would be the perfect model for you

  • 1 motor rear, 2wd, 300miles (base)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • 2 motor rear, 2wd, 500 miles (sport LR)

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    90

bob/lego/gamer

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I just need the 4wd and long range for towing, more motors just add more weight(unless its tri for more towing capacity)
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FrankMcEnnis

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I respectfully disagree as those of us that need to drive in snow conditions know that there are no 35 inch snow tires on the market.

so, until that is available, I guess that is what you classify as driving on the edge. However, those of us in Northern climates is just driving in the winter
35 inch tire are indeed available in snow tire, some of my friend have them here in Quebec

Before I could make a decision on how many motors and how much range I want, I need to know how quickly the cybertruck will accept of charge for roughly 250 mi of range. That's all I need between stops, so if say for example the cybertruck could charge that much range in 15 minutes all I would ever want is a 300 mi truck for less money and less weight while on driving. With that scenario, my choice would be a AWD dual motor with 300mi. Of range. Plenty quick and lighter is better off-road.
250mile of range in the best condition? Waht about, during winter and with a 6000 pound trailer? that would drop significantly.
 

Crissa

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250mile of range in the best condition? Waht about, during winter and with a 6000 pound trailer? that would drop significantly.
What portion of pickups tow trailers? Long distance? In the winter?

Different people, different needs.

-Crissa
 

Bill906

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A limited slip differential provides only a small gain compared to having an independent motor for each wheel. First, it can't even engage until there is more than ideal amounts of traction loss. It is very slow to engage and disengage and very crude in it's ability to proportion torque effectively. Worse, it depends upon friction discs which are wear items that also contaminate the oil in the differential. It is also very innefficient from an energy useage perspective.

Independent electric drive of each wheel opens an entirely new realm of possibilities, with incomparable advantages and none of the disadvantages of a limited slip differential. It can perform far superior to a full locking differential in the nastiest off-road traction situation, while providing far more grip accelerating on icy surfaces due to its ability to respond nearly instantaneously to changing traction conditions. And it doesn't increase mechanical complexity at all, it simplifies it by removing the expensive differental gears that are required whenever two wheel are driven from one motor, ICE or electric. It also gets rid of the oil the differential gears must be partially submerged in, increasing efficiency further.

The traction advantages in snow and ice of having independent motors vs. a differential of any type should not be underestimated. With skilled programming of the drive electronics, the difference is night/day. I suppose you could call this a "performance advantage" but many will find it misleading because they think of "performance" as relating to racing or performance driving. However the advantage is one of being able to get there, of getting stuck (or not) and of losing traction in a corner and sliding into the ravine (or not). The safety benefits of being able to maintain optimum traction on icy roads is why I think calling it a "minor performance advantage" is not representative of the very significant benefits individual motors bring to the automotive world.

Boat ramps can be very slippery and I've personally witnessed many four-wheel drive trucks need a tow to get their boat out of the water in situations where a truck with only RWD could have had success if both rear wheels had an electric motor dedicated to each wheel. That's because steep ramps transfer most of the weight to the rear wheels anyway and, between the ramp steepness and the trailer tongue weight, the front tires have minimal traction to assist with. Further, even a limited slip differential is very inefficient at maximizing traction relative to electronic control of each wheel. A four motor Cybertruck would obviously be even better.

I would say independent wheel control has huge safety and convenience advantages, in addition to higher performce on and off road. That's in addition to the benefits of efficiency, mechanical simplicity and reduced count of wear parts.
Thank you!

For saying what I've tried to say but didn't have the wordsmithing abilities you do.

Well said!
 


HaulingAss

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I respectfully disagree as those of us that need to drive in snow conditions know that there are no 35 inch snow tires on the market.

so, until that is available, I guess that is what you classify as driving on the edge. However, those of us in Northern climates is just driving in the winter
Stop being ridiculous! The post you are disagreeing with has nothing to do with 35" winter tire availablity and everything to do with whether independent motor control of individual wheels adds capability over mechanical differentials. The difference between winter/summer/all-season tires is completely independent of the drive specifics. Better tires will increase performance, but it will not change the relative advantage of one drive system over another.

Furthermore, you are assuming Tesla will not have thought of winter tire availability. Tesla offers winter tires for ALL of their vehicles right on their website. To think Tesla would overlook winter tires on their entry to the light truck market is a ridiculous conclusion to draw from an unrelated discussion.

Tesla knows the driving dynamics and performance of al of their vehicles requires suitable tires and has a long history of working with leading tire manufacturers to develop tires optimized for the specific needs of their vehicles. If there are no suitable winter tires on the market, that is only because the Cybertruck is not on the market either. Michelin introduced Tesla specific tires for the Model 3 upon the release of the Model 3. Those tires were not available before the car was, they were introduced simultaneously with the Model 3.

The four motor Cybertruck is going to have ground-breaking performance in the snow and ice. Yes, there will be suitable winter tires available. Anyone who doubts this hasn't been paying attention to Tesla's intense focus on all aspects of automotive safety.
 

Ogre

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I wish, tesla would see that poll and make what's voted most lol
Keep in mind, motors are only a small percentage of total cost.

The tri motor config was $20k more expensive at launch, but most of that difference was due to increased battery capacity rather than the extra motor.

If Tesla launched a dual motor for $67,000 and the tri motor for $69,000, you can bet most people would get the tri motor even though they only really need the dual.
 

Longranger

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My needs will be met or exceeded by a dual motor with 500 mile range. The more specialized or niche a buyers needs are the more likely they are to be disappointed. like everyone else I wait impatiently for final specs, prices and available configurations for early cybertrucks.

The more set a buyer is on specific features such as 500 miles range or bust, 6th seat, pass through, pillar storage, bed dimensions exceeding the competition, etc…, to name a few, the more likely they will be frustrated, particularly by the initial offering.

My main worries are price and ability to defer buying if the initial truck is loaded with features I don,t need. Suspect my position is common.
 

TBONO

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Stop being ridiculous! The post you are disagreeing with has nothing to do with 35" winter tire availablity and everything to do with whether independent motor control of individual wheels adds capability over mechanical differentials. The difference between winter/summer/all-season tires is completely independent of the drive specifics. Better tires will increase performance, but it will not change the relative advantage of one drive system over another.

Furthermore, you are assuming Tesla will not have thought of winter tire availability. Tesla offers winter tires for ALL of their vehicles right on their website. To think Tesla would overlook winter tires on their entry to the light truck market is a ridiculous conclusion to draw from an unrelated discussion.

Tesla knows the driving dynamics and performance of al of their vehicles requires suitable tires and has a long history of working with leading tire manufacturers to develop tires optimized for the specific needs of their vehicles. If there are no suitable winter tires on the market, that is only because the Cybertruck is not on the market either. Michelin introduced Tesla specific tires for the Model 3 upon the release of the Model 3. Those tires were not available before the car was, they were introduced simultaneously with the Model 3.

The four motor Cybertruck is going to have ground-breaking performance in the snow and ice. Yes, there will be suitable winter tires available. Anyone who doubts this hasn't been paying attention to Tesla's intense focus on all aspects of automotive safety.
Ridiculous? Thanks for that.

You claim it will have: “ground-breaking performance in the snow and ice”

based on what? The kool-aid?

It’s well known it’s all about tires when it comes to snow and Ice.

it would be great if Tesla develops a dedicated snow tire. However, not sure why you think it’s a given it will happen just because it offers snow tires on its other vehicles which come in more standard tire sizes. Developing a soft compound 35” snow tire for a very heavy vehicle is not a given.

the Raptor and TRX come with factory 35” tires and do not have a dedicated snow tire in the market.

The other poster says yes there is a 35 inch snow tire. I said OK show me one as I’ve been looking for years and it does not exist- the response: crickets

My friends new model X sucks in deep snow (with dedicated snow tires) due to the electronics so, I’ll take the best motor config and pray CT doesn’t rely on model X electronics/SW for winter drive modes
 
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HaulingAss

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Ridiculous? Thanks for that.

You claim it will have: “ground-breaking performance in the snow and ice”

based on what? The kool-aid?

It’s well known it’s all about tires when it comes to snow and Ice.

it would be great if Tesla develops a dedicated snow tire. However, not sure why you think it’s a given it will happen just because it offers snow tires on its other vehicles which come in more standard tire sizes. Developing a soft compound 35” snow tire for a very heavy vehicle is not a given.

the Raptor and TRX come with factory 35” tires and do not have a dedicated snow tire in the market.

The other poster says yes there is a 35 inch snow tire. I said OK show me one as I’ve been looking for years and it does not exist- the response: crickets

My friends new model X sucks in deep snow (with dedicated snow tires) due to the electronics so, I’ll take the best motor config and pray CT doesn’t rely on model X electronics/SW for winter drive modes
I'm basing it on the excellent snow and ice driving dynamics of my AWD Performance Model 3 that drives like a bat outta hell on icy mountain roads. I'm a life-long ski enthusiast and have driven just about every car out there that skiers like, from Audi's to Subarus and Volvo's.

The AWD Performance Model 3 has something special and it doesn't take a big imagination to understand that Tesla will likely put the Cybertruck's four-wheel steering to good use to maintain traction and directional control in conditions likely to challenge regular drivers.

With the ablity to hunker it's suspension down and instantaneous independent control of each wheel it will blow other 4x4 trucks out of the water. I have a 2010 F-150 4x4 Supercab and it's a pig under ultra-low traction scenarios. Don't get me wrong, it's fine in normal snow and ice but when traction is truely minimal it fails pretty badly because it's a crude machine with slow response. The limited slip differential is draggy and even the slight side-slope of the road caused by the crown in the center is enough to make it difficult to maintain control. This is no different than the 1980's Dodge Wagons I used to drive professionally to and from the ski area. It was good with real winter tires right until the conditions became treacherous. Then it lacked sensitivity to maintain traction. That's just the nature of the design and sub-optimal ICE componetry.

I would love to rally a Model X in the snow and ice. Obviously, it wouldn't be as good as a Performance Model 3 due to it's more conservative programming and it's higher center of gravity, but one could still put it through it's paces if they knew how to drive it.
 


TBONO

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I'm basing it on the excellent snow and ice driving dynamics of my AWD Performance Model 3 that drives like a bat outta hell on icy mountain roads. I'm a life-long ski enthusiast and have driven just about every car out there that skiers like, from Audi's to Subarus and Volvo's.

The AWD Performance Model 3 has something special and it doesn't take a big imagination to understand that Tesla will likely put the Cybertruck's four-wheel steering to good use to maintain traction and directional control in conditions likely to challenge regular drivers.

With the ablity to hunker it's suspension down and instantaneous independent control of each wheel it will blow other 4x4 trucks out of the water. I have a 2010 F-150 4x4 Supercab and it's a pig under ultra-low traction scenarios. Don't get me wrong, it's fine in normal snow and ice but when traction is truely minimal it fails pretty badly because it's a crude machine with slow response. The limited slip differential is draggy and even the slight side-slope of the road caused by the crown in the center is enough to make it difficult to maintain control. This is no different than the 1980's Dodge Wagons I used to drive professionally to and from the ski area. It was good with real winter tires right until the conditions became treacherous. Then it lacked sensitivity to maintain traction. That's just the nature of the design and sub-optimal ICE componetry.

I would love to rally a Model X in the snow and ice. Obviously, it wouldn't be as good as a Performance Model 3 due to it's more conservative programming and it's higher center of gravity, but one could still put it through it's paces if they knew how to drive it.
Yay! that’s great - a fellow skiing enthusiast!

I agree regarding the model three. Mine has Nokian snow tires on all four and it is absolutely awesome in the snow (I would stay on par with my Subaru outback )

as long as I have ground clearance,

which is often an issue especially this year in Tahoe the second snowiest on record.

I also ski patrol and I’m allowed access on the highway when it is closed so the Tesla model three stays at home and the TRX gets through even though it does not have snow tires. but it does have clearance to get me out of my driveway into the highway. I am very excited at the prospect of 16 inches of ground clearance claimed for the cybertruck. This would crush everything else in the industry from what I’ve seen I think the Rivian might be close to that.
 
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FrankMcEnnis

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