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greggertruck

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gantry crane of course. No one would question that. I challenge the notion that there would be a brake being installed there when no such brake has been delivered to GA yet. I posted some links to possible brake manufacturers and nothing that could handle the size (length and material thickness) of the CT has been delivered. You are welcome to your conjectures; I just don't believe it.
Did you see Kobe hits Houston tomorrow!?

 

JBee

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I think the whole exoskeleton thing kind of played into that concept. I’d honestly kind of assumed there were 2 main pieces that were folded for L/R halves, but never really thought about it for more than say… 29 seconds. If only I’d have put that last second in.

If sail pillar storage happens, there will be 2 panels in the rear.

I kind of think a better description of this design would be a truss body. I suspect there are 2 continuous pieces of steel tubing on each side of the truck forming the top of the triangle which tie the whole side together.

It is possible they will use a brake to fold the front quarter, 2 doors, and rear quarter, then it will be cut after folding. Then those pieces are used for the some truck. Would mean fewer folds total and the parts would be potentially easier to match up.
Nice! 😆

I remember once I was "critically acclaimed" for pointing this out a few months back.

Exoskeleton is more of a marketing term than an actual structure that meets the definition of "exoskeleton".
 

Jhodgesatmb

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Nice! 😆

I remember once I was "critically acclaimed" for pointing this out a few months back.

Exoskeleton is more of a marketing term than an actual structure that meets the definition of "exoskeleton".
You guys live in a fantasy world of your own making, but I am betting you are (all of you) wrong.
 


JBee

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You guys live in a fantasy world of your own making, but I am betting you are (all of you) wrong.
Sorry I'm too lazy and busy at this time of the year to rehash this again, but if you want to know my opinion on what the exoskeleton is, have a read of this:

https://www.cybertruckownersclub.co...-is-there-a-frame-underneath.5674/post-118846

There's a couple of other threads that have pages of conversation n the subject that all lead to the same perspective that the term "exoskeleton" is not strictly adhered too or relevant, except as a EM marketing term. Just search JBee "exoskeleton" otherwise. :)
 

Jhodgesatmb

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Sorry I'm too lazy and busy at this time of the year to rehash this again, but if you want to know my opinion on what the exoskeleton is, have a read of this:

https://www.cybertruckownersclub.co...-is-there-a-frame-underneath.5674/post-118846

There's a couple of other threads that have pages of conversation n the subject that all lead to the same perspective that the term "exoskeleton" is not strictly adhered too or relevant, except as a EM marketing term. Just search JBee "exoskeleton" otherwise. :)
I guess we will just have to wait and see. It’s Thanksgiving and I don’t feel like picking your earlier argument apart. Suffice it to say that if Elon wants to call it an exoskeleton, and it isn’t either a body on frame or unibody design, I am fine going along with it. Cheers!
 

HaulingAss

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Nice! 😆

I remember once I was "critically acclaimed" for pointing this out a few months back.

Exoskeleton is more of a marketing term than an actual structure that meets the definition of "exoskeleton".
No, you just don't understand how a truss carries load. Cybertruck will be an exoskeleton and it will be stiffer than any other pickup ever built and have a higher payload capacity than any other truck of it's weight.
 

Greg

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Glad to hear this! Would hate to have to replace the entire vehicle body for a dent, accident etc on one side of the truck.
 


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greggertruck

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It arrived in Houston 5 minutes ago!
Looks like due at port around noon today!

maybe I’ll have a 9k press BOL by end of day! Will be busy with Black Friday but will check as I can!
 

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It is obvious the body will be made of many pieces welded together. However I also have the question of why the doors need to be so heavy as they don’t really have really good interface with the body so structural strength added would be relatively minimum. In theory a good cross beam reenforcing the laches/hinges with a thin piece of same metal door skin would do but obviously there has to be reasons Tesla did it besides why not make the doors to be Level IIIA protection.
 

HaulingAss

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Nice! 😆

I remember once I was "critically acclaimed" for pointing this out a few months back.

Exoskeleton is more of a marketing term than an actual structure that meets the definition of "exoskeleton".
I think you are misunderstanding the meaning of "critical acclaim".

While it's true that more knowledgable posters were critical of your perspective, that definitely doesn't mean what you think it does. Being critical of something is the opposite of "critical acclaim".

The other obvious error here is that you seem to be under the mistaken belief that Tesla needs to market the Cybertruck using fancy marketing terms in order to sell it. They have more orders than they will be able to fill for a long time and the new orders will come in faster than they can fill the old orders. Tesla is building a product that is good enough to sell itself, not relying on misleading marketing and meaningless marketing terms to sell the Cybertruck.

Here are some photos of trucks without exoskeletons:

1669394342763.png

1669394375283.png

1669394410398.png

1669394454506.png

1669394492909.png

1669394517106.png

1669394721437.png


Forum members who are more astute in terms of understanding the structural strength of 3 dimensional structures will already have an inherent understanding of how the exoskeleton frame of the Cybertruck, with its shape like a truss bridge, will be able to resist the bending forces that destroyed the trucks above, without resorting to heavy steel frames under the bed and cab, by taking advantage of the natural strength of a triangle.

Said another way, the Cybertruck will be able to resist much higher forces for its weight compared to the inefficient structural designs of the trucks in the photos above, by harnessing the power of a skinned truss. It would be an exoskeleton with or without the skin on it but skinning a trussed structure is a well-known method of making the truss even stronger. And, in this case the skin is 3mm thick, roll hardened stainless steel which is at the cusp of being considered "plate steel". That means the skin will become a major source of the superior rigidity and strength of the Cybertruck's structure.

The fact that door openings exist does not negate this fact. A skinned structure does not have be completely skinned to take advantage of the additional strength imparted by the skin. You will also find that the doors of the Cybertruck will add additional crush resistance to the cabin compartment by using latches and hinges far stronger than required for simple door functionality.

And remember, being critical of something does not imply "critical acclaim" and thinking you understand something, and actually understanding that thing are two very different things.
 

Jhodgesatmb

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It is obvious the body will be made of many pieces welded together. However I also have the question of why the doors need to be so heavy as they don’t really have really good interface with the body so structural strength added would be relatively minimum. In theory a good cross beam reenforcing the laches/hinges with a thin piece of same metal door skin would do but obviously there has to be reasons Tesla did it besides why not make the doors to be Level IIIA protection.
I am sure that you have seen the unveiling where they hit the door with a sledge hammer. The whole idea was to show that the driver and passengers would be protected against a bullet. It may have nothing to do with the strength of the exoskeleton but it has everything to do with the concept of Cybertruck as an urban-assault / post-armageddon vehicle. So they might as well use the same material as the rest of the exoskeleton.

 

 
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