HaulingAss

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This is one of my top 5 reasons why I ordered a Cybertruck. I love the 3mm thick 300 series stainless steel exoskeleton with a natural finish. It eliminates most door dings/hail damage/dents, scratched paint, pitted paint from road debris, waxing, polishing, etc. There is no other full size truck currently on the market that even comes close in exterior durability. Even the bed will be stainless steel. WOW!!!
I know, right?

Ford, GMC and Dodge have been telling us for decades how "tough" their trucks are but they've been lying through their teeth, it's just typical marketing. They are not tough unless your definition of "tough" is being clad in soft, thin, mild steel that requires a coat of paint be maintained to prevent them rusting away in a flash. Strip the paint off with an acid and the metal will rust to nothing after a couple of years in normal weather. Watch an errant baseball leave a big ugly dent. Hey, kids! Don't be playing ball around my truck because it's weak and fragile and I don't want it to get a dent. Be careful!

Let a fresh breeze cause a shopping cart to roll across the parking lot and into the side of your "tough" truck and see how tough it really is. Yes, you're going to have a new door dent. Throw a small split of firewood over the side of the bed, you had better hope your grip doesn't slip last minute causing it to bang into the side of the bed! Cause that's gonna leave a mark! Ford even makes their trucks out of softer aluminum now - they are going in the wrong direction. Yet they still call them "Ford tough".

Hailstorm? Better park that "tough" truck under a real roof. Cause those hailstones are going to leave some nice dents in that thin soft metal! Even driving down the highway small stones and pebbles will remove chips in that paint.

The Cybertruck can handle all of these threats and more without breaking a sweat. It'll be the first truck that can be honestly marketed as being "tough". Ford, GM and Dodge could learn a thing or two about what it means to be tough and powerful. They are about to be humiliated!
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Cyberman

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3mm thick over the entire area of the vehicle (and the rumored bottom skin) plus the bed, plus the interior compartments like the frunk and the bed cover would be way too heavy. Do the math. Simple example - if there is a bottom skin that covers the entire length say maybe 20' long x 6' wide x 0.11" thick x about 500 lbs / cu ft is over 500 lbs of weight right there.

There is a reason Ford is making parts of their trucks out of aluminum and NOT 3mm thick steel. Hauling around excess weight is just a waste of energy and resources and cuts into performance for driving, cornering, and stopping.
(Sigh) Please do just a little research before putting forth nonsensical ideas. The reason Ford has been using aluminum is they are obligated to improve mileage every few years as Uncle Sam squeezes them to improve fuel efficiency. Yes, SS is heavier, and the exoskeleton is heavy, but that extra weight is offset by not having a body-on-frame. This is the magic of the exoskeleton design, it's kinda like the frame is built into the body. This is how my dude Elon overcame the challenge to produce a badass pickup that'll last forever, without making it overly heavy. Cybertruck isn't a behemoth like the resurrected Hummer, it's in its own category, like Pink Floyd. Nothing else like it, defies classification, blows mind, will live on forever. Don't be talking trash, eh? Don't be talking trash!
 
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tmeyer3

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If they could also install stiffeners between the outer skin and inner skin will enhance strength.

aircraft magic.png

Wait, isn't that exactly what the 8000 ton press is for?
 

Ogre

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Wait, isn't that exactly what the 8000 ton press is for?
The press is to make the front and rear assemblies. The bottom of the truck in front and aft of the battery.
 

Gordon E Peterson II

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Wait, isn't that exactly what the 8000 ton press is for?
The 8,000 ton GIgapress is to cast (high-strength aluminum alloy) the rear suspension/chassis (and bed?). These will be the largest aluminum castings in the world.
 

Keeney

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(Sigh) Please do just a little research before putting forth nonsensical ideas.
Do the math before putting forth nonsensical ideas. The frame of a typical pickup is a hollow C-shaped beam maybe 6-8" high x 3 " wide x the length of the truck and its cross section is only about 1/8 thick. Steel. Same density as stainless steel. Hardly comparable to the weight of making the entire cybertruck surface area 1/8 thick. Heck, just the sides of the cybertruck are 20-30" high x the length of the truck. To help you with your calculations, steel and stainless steel both weigh about the same - 0.28 lb per cubic inch.

I strongly doubt all the sheet metal on the cybertruck is 1/8 thick - it would weigh too much.

In regards to why you want to make your truck lighter, Tesla has even MORE incentive to make the cybertruck light - they need the efficiency to accomplish their range goals.
 

Ogre

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Do the math before putting forth nonsensical ideas.
Tesla has a very good track record of delivering the products which they demonstrate. I also know they make the most efficient cars in the industry (in terms of weight, aerodynamics, range). Munro—a respected, well known auto engineer who is not affiliated with Tesla—also suggests the exoskeleton concept is likely a huge potential weight savings.

The 3mm sides and doors are a feature of the truck every bit as much as the weight and towing capacity. Tesla wouldn’t have rolled a truck out on stage and smashed the side of it with a sledge hammer and claimed it was bullet proof if they didn’t fully expect to deliver that product to the public. They do a lot of goofy stuff and miss their projections on delivery dates, but they have to date been extremely good at delivering the product they demo.

I’m certain Tesla is going to use the lightest possible materials wherever they can possibly get away with it. But the sides, and doors, are going to be 3mm steel. The bed lining and much of the rest? I’m sure it depends entirely on whether that thickness is needed to be structural. The floor is the structural battery pack so the truck is almost certainly not going to have a layer of 3mm stainless on top of that.

In the unlikely event that Tesla ends up delivering something without 3mm stainless sides and doors, it will be shocking. I strongly suspect they would lose a lot of sales if that were the case. They made big claims about the durability of this truck and they need to follow through with them.

I pay Tesla to “do the math”, they are quite good at it.
 
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Crissa

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The entire point of making the outsides of the Cybertruck out of this steel is that it increases the stiffness.

I've said it before, and I'll say it again: The Cybertruck is like a segment of a bridge. The big arches that go around a truss bridge are stronger the further out from the moment of movement. (That's usually the middle, btw)

That means that putting the structure out at the ends gives it more leverage against forces. Which means that it doesn't need as much structure inside as a typical ladder-frame truck does in the middle. So it can get away with aluminum stringers to hang the batteries, motors, and suspension, whereas the ladder-frame trucks can't. And those crossing members won't have to even be as strong as they would for other trucks. They just have to be stiff. Which aluminum and light-weight epoxies are really good at.

A uni-body (body that moves as a unit) car is much lighter for the same strength than a body-on-frame. Those ladders are just cheaper than unibody, which have to be tested and designed much more closely. This is just another step - the folded, exoskeleton unibody design.

Those super-stiff, ding-resisting sides will protect and give more strength for the buck.

-Crissa
 
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Mini2nut

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My hunch is that the front crumple zone area will be a thinner stainless steel. Those parts include both fenders, hood and lower valance. My guess is the hood may also be scored in certain areas on the bottom side to aid in folding properly during a frontal collision.

74FDB938-5CE0-4E93-8F93-1508ADBAA268.jpeg
 

Cyberman

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Do the math before putting forth nonsensical ideas. The frame of a typical pickup is a hollow C-shaped beam maybe 6-8" high x 3 " wide x the length of the truck and its cross section is only about 1/8 thick. Steel. Same density as stainless steel. Hardly comparable to the weight of making the entire cybertruck surface area 1/8 thick. Heck, just the sides of the cybertruck are 20-30" high x the length of the truck. To help you with your calculations, steel and stainless steel both weigh about the same - 0.28 lb per cubic inch.

I strongly doubt all the sheet metal on the cybertruck is 1/8 thick - it would weigh too much.

In regards to why you want to make your truck lighter, Tesla has even MORE incentive to make the cybertruck light - they need the efficiency to accomplish their range goals.
3mm is pretty damn close to 1/8"
 

FutureBoy

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I am can't wait for Sandy Monroe to perform a "tear down" video of the Cybertruck once it goes into production. I will be very interesting to say the least. I am very interested to see all of the design and engineering under the skin.
I hope Sandy is preparing well for his teardown of the Cybertruck. As excited as he sometimes gets when talking about the innovations that Tesla has made, it wouldn't surprise me if he gets so excited pulling the CT apart that he has a full-on explosion of euphoria. While I am excited to see Sandy's videos on the CT teardown, I worry for his physical and mental health if that were to happen.
 
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