Reference for watt-per-mile usages?

WildhavenMI

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Hi All!

I'm trying to assess the relative energy efficiency of different electric vehicles, and attempt to project an efficiency metric for the CT, as it comes to "energy used per mile of propulsion" rough calculation. This is primarily napkin math for me so I can calculate incremental solar capacity need when adding new EV(s) to the personal fleet.

I know what my PHV uses right now, and my buddy's Bolt also gives me good numbers to model from, but I don't have any "real world" data on how energy consumption for 200 highway miles in a Bolt compares to 200 highway miles in, say, a Model Y in terms of actual energy used.

Yes, I know lots of discrepancy on weather, route, conditions, (and obviously vehicle size/weight/drag)etc. I'm just looking at range estimates in vehicles with similar sized packs and assuming there must be some huge swings in how efficiently those electric motors actually use that energy.





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Hazzzard122

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I have a bolt, mostly city driving, but if you’re looking for highway I could do a reset and go for a drive if you don’t get answers
 

stimpy

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I have a Model S and I get 240-280 Wh/mile, but this varies depending on the weather. During the winter when I have the heat on I'm closer to 300 Wh/mile. My wife drives a Model X and it get's 280-300 Wh/mile average when the weather is mild.

It also depends on how you drive, I drive conservatively so I get pretty good efficiency, but if you drive more aggressively the energy consumption will go up significantly.
 

Newton

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edited...old leaf i drive sits at (for city/ some highway) 4.4 miles per kwh or 227 wh per mile
and highway is around 3.6 MILES per khwor 278 wh per mile

i rarely use ac or heat

miles per kwh seems simplier to me
 
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rr6013

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I'm trying to assess the relative energy efficiency of different electric vehicles, and attempt to project an efficiency metric for the CT, as it comes to "energy used per mile of propulsion" rough calculation. This is primarily napkin math for me so I can calculate incremental solar capacity need when adding new EV(s) to the personal fleet.

I know what my PHV uses right now, and my buddy's Bolt also gives me good numbers to model from, but I don't have any "real world" data on how energy consumption for 200 highway miles in a Bolt compares to 200 highway miles in, say, a Model Y in terms of actual energy used.

Yes, I know lots of discrepancy on weather, route, conditions, (and obviously vehicle size/weight/drag)etc. I'm just looking at range estimates in vehicles with similar sized packs and assuming there must be some huge swings in how efficiently those electric motors actually use that energy.
REPOST from Internet…


Assuming that the truck weight, i.e. 5000 pounds but less aerodynamically efficient than an model “X”, I’m guessing that around 400 Wh/m efficiency is about right. Especially with the highly efficient PM motors.
So, 250 x 300 = 75kWh for the $40k version, 300 x 300 = 100kWh for the mid range and 500 x 300 = 150kWh for the high end…

Now, charging a 150kWh battery at 250kW up to 50% SOC and another 100kW to full should take about 24 + 60 = 84 minutes…

At home, with a 9.6kW charger, that’s 21 hours from empty to full! I would argue that supercharging is a must have for these very large batteries… Also, I’m hopping that the truck will have dual on-board 80A chargers which Tesla discontinued…
 

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