Will the CT come with MCU3

rr6013

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I don't think Tesla updates will be reversible after you the download. Tesla has come a long way since they started and most of that has been software advancements. The plan that they have even in the short run is supposed to greatly improve upon the current system as well as bring out new features. A lot of these updates also included minor changes to the current safety systems and I don't think Tesla will ever allow someone to undo an upgrade to a safety feature and I don't think you could just keep the safety feature but not the rest of the update.

One thing that is hinted at coming in the future is the app store in cars. Once Tesla has it's own apps for a lot of different programs, it would allow more customization. If you don't want a game, or you don't need spotify, you will probably have the option to delete that app. Then Tesla updates could be strictly for vehicle controls and driving software, while you can pick and choose everything else that you want.
Cyber in Cybertruck alluded to much more than an Apple-style form of ownership class of subscribing to functionality through rents paid off an App in a Store. Cyber laid bare a promise that a truck could be more, much more than the sum of its parts. I’d envisioned a Cyber-Garage before an appliance app store.

Cybertruck posited truck as platform. That a truck can be customized configured, upgraded and reprogrammed to suit your needs as they change, OTA on-the-fly, is Cyber and Cybertruck. Over time, Cybertruck , the vehicle, never grows obsolete that way before its million mile battery. Left as an exercise for Tesla was to deliver on the Cyber-half of Cybertruck promise after delivering its truck as platform.

Two AMD chips crunching 10 Tflops, if included in CT, goes a long way to providing headroom for supporting an on-board process-intensive platform. DOJO + OTA implied off-platform capabilities. StarLink +VoIP implied a mesh of possibilities. And FSD was very first mention that, Cyber-enabled, Cybertruck had revenue enhancement potential for those who opted for an $8k FSD capability. I never got any impression that rents were part of Tesla’s Cyber plan off of an App Store to gain Cyber functionality.

Cybertruck has tons of potential. But any stripping functionality at the expense of subscription, upgrade and revision crosses an ownership property line. OTA kill instructions that disable a vehicle or funtion blatantly steals property off a vehicle paid at time of sale in a violent irresponsible way. Service actions that change vehicle performance, specification or substitute “improvements” that effect the same, are in-kind takings from owners.
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CyberMoose

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Cyber in Cybertruck alluded to much more than an Apple-style form of ownership class of subscribing to functionality through rents paid off an App in a Store. Cyber laid bare a promise that a truck could be more, much more than the sum of its parts. I’d envisioned a Cyber-Garage before an appliance app store.

Cybertruck posited truck as platform. That a truck can be customized configured, upgraded and reprogrammed to suit your needs as they change, OTA on-the-fly, is Cyber and Cybertruck. Over time, Cybertruck , the vehicle, never grows obsolete that way before its million mile battery. Left as an exercise for Tesla was to deliver on the Cyber-half of Cybertruck promise after delivering its truck as platform.

Two AMD chips crunching 10 Tflops, if included in CT, goes a long way to providing headroom for supporting an on-board process-intensive platform. DOJO + OTA implied off-platform capabilities. StarLink +VoIP implied a mesh of possibilities. And FSD was very first mention that, Cyber-enabled, Cybertruck had revenue enhancement potential for those who opted for an $8k FSD capability. I never got any impression that rents were part of Tesla’s Cyber plan off of an App Store to gain Cyber functionality.

Cybertruck has tons of potential. But any stripping functionality at the expense of subscription, upgrade and revision crosses an ownership property line. OTA kill instructions that disable a vehicle or funtion blatantly steals property off a vehicle paid at time of sale in a violent irresponsible way. Service actions that change vehicle performance, specification or substitute “improvements” that effect the same, are in-kind takings from owners.
Software is the biggest part of advancements these days. I've never complained that my phone or my laptop became outdated because the software that was released became too much for them to handle and I won't complain if that were to happen with my vehicles as long as I could upgrade them for a reasonable cost and the hardware lasted a reasonable amount of time. The Tesla website lists an upgrade from MCU1 to MCU2 at $2000CAD plus tax, so about $2100-2250 depending on the province here in Canada. That's less 5% of the value of the a cheaper model Tesla. Going forward with Tesla's hardware changes, specially computer hardware, this shouldn't be an issue in the luxury models.

Even if it did require hardware replacements after certain amounts of time, I don't think that's unreasonable. When I got the timing belt changed on my car, i paid almost $4000. a basic oil change when I lived downtown and didn't have my own garage to do it in was about $130 every time. Also it's not like other vehicles from other companies or vehicles that have the same software as most android phones won't have the same issues, this will happen to any hardware that recieve updates, eventually the hardware will be outdated.
 

rr6013

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Software is the biggest part of advancements these days. I've never complained that my phone or my laptop became outdated because the software that was released became too much for them to handle and I won't complain if that were to happen with my vehicles as long as I could upgrade them for a reasonable cost and the hardware lasted a reasonable amount of time. The Tesla website lists an upgrade from MCU1 to MCU2 at $2000CAD plus tax, so about $2100-2250 depending on the province here in Canada. That's less 5% of the value of the a cheaper model Tesla. Going forward with Tesla's hardware changes, specially computer hardware, this shouldn't be an issue in the luxury models.

Even if it did require hardware replacements after certain amounts of time, I don't think that's unreasonable. When I got the timing belt changed on my car, i paid almost $4000. a basic oil change when I lived downtown and didn't have my own garage to do it in was about $130 every time. Also it's not like other vehicles from other companies or vehicles that have the same software as most android phones won't have the same issues, this will happen to any hardware that recieve updates, eventually the hardware will be outdated.
That 22 yo Tahoe in bio pic was revisioned 0 times. It still runs daily. The electronics all function after 22 yrs. The idea that a truck just because it is cyber somehow must obsolete exactly as an appliance phone you buy from Apple is a false equivalency.

The core concept buying a thing in hardware is that it is a fixed entity. That entity is what you pay to own. The pride of ownership is what it can do. Cybertruck is sold with software-defined capabilities. That feature set comprises a totality of truck as platform. The buyer expectation is that Tesla are providing a million mile lifetime of usage from battery alone. Buyers make an equivalence that the non-consumables on the entity Tesla engineered for a million miles.

Tesla further enables backwards compatibility to future enhancements it makes that enable new capabilities which Tesla chooses to provide owners of earlier Generation entities, THAT is up to owners to decide to pay additional for addition capability.

What’s not OK is stripping. Forced revisions that deprecate, eliminate, change or alter original functionality that was included in the entity and for which an owner paid.

Its so not cool for Tesla to unilaterally throttle battery charge capacity in service to extending battery life. Owners who wish to throttle battery should be free to elect, opt-in or be compensated accordingly. AMD releases a 10X SoC backwards compatible to early Gen entities, Tesla are due BIG $$$$$$$$$$ compensation for making available to those owners who choose to pay the newest, latest and greatest revision. Agreed.
 

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Functionality that requires hardware or networks that no longer exist isn't the same as stripping, either.

So like those drivers that saw their range and charge speed dip on a revision were just seeing the aging process of their hardware being revealed. The id3 owners are about to face the fact that the network their cars talk to no longer exists.

Now, a good example of stripping was when Wacom (a pc peripheral company) updated their drivers not to support the current Java but instead released the final few versions not only on a deprecated version of Java, but reserving UI elements and variables for higher tier versions of their hardware - if you had the older ones, you had the features taken away as they retired the hardware to lower tiers of UX.

-Crissa
 

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I would say this does not apply to the CT. They are making it from stainless steel, armor glass, and will have the new million mile battery....sound like they want you to have it for the long haul to me.

I agree though, technology does change rapidly and a vehicle so focused on tech needs to have upgrade paths for hardware as well as software.
I agree, we should definately be able to repair this ourselves; not only to reduce the carbon footprint and that it is ethically soind policy for what the Tesla vision encapsulates.
 

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That 22 yo Tahoe in bio pic was revisioned 0 times. It still runs daily. The electronics all function after 22 yrs. The idea that a truck just because it is cyber somehow must obsolete exactly as an appliance phone you buy from Apple is a false equivalency.
You're comparing a vehicle that isn't connected to anything against a vehicle that if possible to connect to the network, will automatically be connected to a network to make sure you have the most up to date version. The electronic functions of your Tahoe is probably limited to power windows, power doors, a radio/cd player, and maybe a navigational screen that to be updated would require a CD mailed by a company. My comparison between a Tesla and a phone is better because i'm talking about the software and hardware that make it possible for it to do everything a Tesla can do currently.

I'm not explaining how I think things should work, i'm explaining what I believe will happen with Tesla vehicles and i'm trying to relate that to real world products with similar hardware/software update requirements. I am also giving my opinion that what Tesla is doing is completely fair.

To look at this from Tesla's point of view, I believe they wouldn't want to give people the option for certain software updates. Tesla is very proud of it's safety numbers compared to the average driver, you can find lots of articles that compare Tesla with FSD, Autopilot, Safety features enables and safety features disables vs the average driver. Tesla wants people to have an extremely safe vehicle, that's why all Tesla vehicles recieve an amazing safety score. Tesla didn't just meet requirements, they went far beyond them, the model X broke a machine that was meant to test how strong the roof was during testing and recieved a score of 5.4/5. A massive part of the safety in a Tesla is software related, so many drivers have reported times where Tesla have avoided collisions with vehicles or pedestrians before the driver even reacted because of the current software, that will improve in the time to come with these updates.
 

rr6013

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Functionality that requires hardware or networks that no longer exist isn't the same as stripping, either.

<Snip>
Hehe…Agreed it isn’t stripping, deprecation nor theft. So says he, who still uses iPhone 4s, Mac OS 10 and still using networks despite being 9 generations behind. Those are appliances.

Cybertruck has so much potential that NOT upgrading it would adversely impact the vehicle’s value. But the case remains buyers are paying USD to own CT .vs. rent or subscription. What is owned? What is the value proposition? What does Tesla not sell in the transaction of transferring MCO to title in owner’s names?

By appliance-logic, a phone legacy, Tesla could stop OTA to owners of Tesla vehicles, as a hypothetical. Tesla could switch transport layers to Tesla vehicles changing to via space-to-air from Starlink. That effectively would brick OTA, no? Kill FSD?

Abandoning technology paid not delivered such as the OTA or FSD loss of functionality via Starlink transport layer switchover is a form of obsolescence. It de-platforms functionality. That loss is gone entirely, functionally unsupported or functionally impaired. Keeping OTA and FSD would require investment, upgrade and a subscription to Starlink.

The property(CT) is devalued unless upgraded. I’m an owner who thinks money paid for a million mile battery implies that the Tesla vehicle I bought should be supported a million miles. Transport layer is not a consumable I expect to need to upgrade over the life of the million miles.
 

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Hehe…Agreed it isn’t stripping, deprecation nor theft. So says he, who still uses iPhone 4s, Mac OS 10 and still using networks despite being 9 generations behind. Those are appliances.

Cybertruck has so much potential that NOT upgrading it would adversely impact the vehicle’s value. But the case remains buyers are paying USD to own CT .vs. rent or subscription. What is owned? What is the value proposition? What does Tesla not sell in the transaction of transferring MCO to title in owner’s names?

By appliance-logic, a phone legacy, Tesla could stop OTA to owners of Tesla vehicles, as a hypothetical. Tesla could switch transport layers to Tesla vehicles changing to via space-to-air from Starlink. That effectively would brick OTA, no? Kill FSD?

Abandoning technology paid not delivered such as the OTA or FSD loss of functionality via Starlink transport layer switchover is a form of obsolescence. It de-platforms functionality. That loss is gone entirely, functionally unsupported or functionally impaired. Keeping OTA and FSD would require investment, upgrade and a subscription to Starlink.

The property(CT) is devalued unless upgraded. I’m an owner who thinks money paid for a million mile battery implies that the Tesla vehicle I bought should be supported a million miles. Transport layer is not a consumable I expect to need to upgrade over the life of the million miles.
When you buy a vehicle, they could promise you a transmission that will last a million miles. That doesn't mean the tires, window motors, power door locks, engine, or any of the other parts of the vehicle will also last a million miles.

I also want to point out that this isn't something that will be specifically Tesla. It's going to be any company that has required updates and with a lot of the better vehicle companies now following suit and putting software in vehicles that will be continuously improving, that means that the software will be getting updates, probbaly over the air. Multiple companies have already started this and someday in the future, maybe 3, 5, 8, or any amount of years, they will need a hardware update to keep up to date.

I'm really not trying to argue here, it's just a reality. It's completely possible that Tesla could allow people to stop all updates and leave your vehicle exactly how it is on the day you buy it. If they did, i really wouldn't recommend paying for FSD. However, I still find the possibility of Tesla doing this very unlikely since updates are all about improving the vehicle.
 

rr6013

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I'm not explaining how I think things should work,
Design is not how a thing looks, its how it works - SteveJobs

Cybertruck inherently works the way intended, engineered and designed by Tesla. How the thing works is exactly the topic on the table for discussion.

There is a phone analogy that everyone is happy to accept to define Cybertruck ownership that includes buying hardware, paying for revision upgrades and subscribing to functionalities via a software store. i am asserting that is a false equivalence.

I am not saying that the analog elements are not present, don’t exist or are not funtionally design elements of Cybertruck. Merely, that the assumption that a truck is a pure hardware buy, ownership and a Tesla software EULA license to use the Cyber bits inside software Tesla included but still owns is false from first principles.

Cybertruck is not an appliance. It is not a phone costing hundreds of dollars. Cybertruck is a motor vehicle costing many multiple thousands. You are buying a truck, paying for a truckload of functionality and owning more than the sum total of parts assembled in the driveway.

IF you are not getting a millionmile battery, driving the truck a million miles and have to subscribe to functionality in a store or keep buying new and improved upgrades to continue using Cybertruck, it may not work - at all.
 
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