Cybertruck Tire Size Options What Do You Choose?

FullyGrounded

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A larger tire is heavier, more spinning mass, thus harder to spin. Also, bigger tire means a larger contact patch, which means more rolling resistance.

Oh, and the truck will sit up taller, so more frontal area...

That is why I think a larger tire could mean a shorter range.
A larger wheel/tire isn't necessarily heavier than what comes on the CT - a lot of possibilities here. In fact, I will be putting forth effort to reduce unsprung weight. And, if this is the case, possibly less spinning mass..., acting against the torque. A larger tire doesn't necessarily have a larger contact patch - many factors in play, most importantly, the width of the contact patch. And, just lifting the truck doesn't necessarily mean a greater drag coefficient - if I could emulate a wing with my CT, it would actually benefit the range of my CT.

Yes, in a vacuum, sure. Have a nice day!
 

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I want as much range as possible.

If they offer a "street" tire I will likely go for that, provided the efficiency improves. If they don't, I'll pull the OEM wheels and tires immediately and order aftermarket wheels/tires.

I love the look of the 35's, but I'm sure they negatively affect range.
 

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Isn't what matters the performance and life of the tires, not what the sidewalls look like?

What's wrong with hexagonal hubcaps?

-Crissa
Nothing, but as soon as you go off-road (or rub a curb) they will be destroyed fairly quickly. Some good
 

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A larger tire is heavier, more spinning mass, thus harder to spin. Also, bigger tire means a larger contact patch, which means more rolling resistance.

Oh, and the truck will sit up taller, so more frontal area...

That is why I think a larger tire could mean a shorter range.
Anyone who has ever put bigger tires on their truck would agree with you. My stock F150 went from ~18 MPGs to about 15.5 MPGs after I leveled it and put 35s on it. Stock tires were 275/65/r18. They were about 32" x 11". So 10% larger tire decreased my MPGs ~ 15%.

So...all things being equal (which I'm sure they are not) a stock CT w/35s that gets 500 miles per charge might only get 425 miles per charge if a person put 38s on it which are a 10% larger tire...or with 40s, (which are about 15% larger then stock 35s) one might expect less then 400 miles per charge.

This is very rough math. Only thing I know for certain is the before and after on my truck.

Yes, a larger tire will reduce low speed torque; however, range will likely be enhanced.
0% chance range will increase with a larger tire. It's heavier and will require more energy to move it.
 

FullyGrounded

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Anyone who has ever put bigger tires on their truck would agree with you. My stock F150 went from ~18 MPGs to about 15.5 MPGs after I leveled it and put 35s on it. Stock tires were 275/65/r18. They were about 32" x 11". So 10% larger tire decreased my MPGs ~ 15%.

So...all things being equal (which I'm sure they are not) a stock CT w/35s that gets 500 miles per charge might only get 425 miles per charge if a person put 38s on it which are a 10% larger tire...or with 40s, (which are about 15% larger then stock 35s) one might expect less then 400 miles per charge.

This is very rough math. Only thing I know for certain is the before and after on my truck.



0% chance range will increase with a larger tire. It's heavier and will require more energy to move it.
Not all larger tires are heavier, especially when coupled with certain wheels... some use technology and materials that retain, and maybe even enhance strength, yet keep weight low. Interesting.
 

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Not all larger tires are heavier, especially when coupled with certain wheels... some use technology and materials that retain, and maybe even enhance strength, yet keep weight low. Interesting.
Why not use the same technology on a smaller effieciency-oriented tire, and win twice?

Depending, of course, on how you use the truck.
 
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Yes, a larger tire will reduce low speed torque; however, range will likely be enhanced. Consider, a larger tire has a greater circumference. This greater circumference, when rotated one time, results in a longer distance traveled than a smaller tire with lesser circumference. At speed, the effort to turn this larger wheel (tire), vs the effort to turn the smaller wheel approaches 0.
If you look at Tesla cars usually the larger option tires result in less range, I don't own a Tesla car maybe someone here on the forums can give a somde insight here, I do know electric motors are designed to operate in a certain rpm range and operating lower or higher than the designed range results in less efficiency meaning most likely it will require a little more battery energy to travel the same distance than a stock vehicle but I would like to hear about the advantages after someone tries it out and let us know the real world results.
 
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Not all larger tires are heavier, especially when coupled with certain wheels... some use technology and materials that retain, and maybe even enhance strength, yet keep weight low. Interesting.
Cybertruck will have a load capacity of 3500 lbs, I am sure the required tire will have a load range of E and those tire are not light. Any heavy duty 3/4 or 1 ton truck uses a load E tire and maybe even higher for superduty. Every year I have my winter tires put on my truck which use 235/80 x 17"( dually, steel rims ) and I put up my summer tires and it seems like they get heavier every year....lol
 

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Last night, rolling up to a stoplight with the windows down, a Jeep with big mud tires rolled up beside me.

The road hum from his tires was HORRIBLY loud! My wife commented on it immediately.

I thought about the rolling resistance, constant sound inside his cabin, wear and tear (can't be good with that much NOISE!).

That is something I don't want with the CT.
 

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Last night, rolling up to a stoplight with the windows down, a Jeep with big mud tires rolled up beside me.

The road hum from his tires was HORRIBLY loud! My wife commented on it immediately.

I thought about the rolling resistance, constant sound inside his cabin, wear and tear (can't be good with that much NOISE!).

That is something I don't want with the CT.
I have Nitto tera grappler g2's in 35x12.5 on my gmc 2500 diesel - zero noise inside from the tires, truck has good oem sound installation so it's possible to have both big tires and low noise...granted my m3p with same (fictional obviously) would prob be pretty bad.
 

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The topic of wheel tire/tire combo is one that I’ve spent a lot of time thinking about. I’ll be towing our travel trailer far more often than going off road, so if given the option I’d choose an 18-20 inch wheel with E rated road tires.

That said, I think that a truck’s personality is often defined by the stance a non-stock wheel/tire combo creates. I had aftermarket wheels with BF Goodrich KO2s on my Tundra and loved how they looked and performed. I really like the CT prototype’s tires, but knowing how quickly an M3 eats through tires, I would expect those aggressive knobs to not last that long.
 
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Last night, rolling up to a stoplight with the windows down, a Jeep with big mud tires rolled up beside me.

The road hum from his tires was HORRIBLY loud! My wife commented on it immediately.

I thought about the rolling resistance, constant sound inside his cabin, wear and tear (can't be good with that much NOISE!).

That is something I don't want with the CT.
I travel in my truck, I use it like a RV so I want my truck to be quite, my exhaust system is stock even though I could remove it, my state does not care what I do to my truck, also I run tires that are more geared for highway and some off-road. I listen to a satellite radio and my wife's conversations. When we travel I usually start with a 10 to 12 hour drive and excessive noise just wears at your good mood. I suppose it comes down to how a truck is purposed. I hope the loudest thing about CT is the entertainment system.
 

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Not all larger tires are heavier, especially when coupled with certain wheels... some use technology and materials that retain, and maybe even enhance strength, yet keep weight low. Interesting.
This conversation was about already large truck tires. If you want to add rims to the conversation, OK. I'm still not buying it. We are not talking about tire and rim combos you can put on a car. They need to be able to handle a load and off-roading.

Show me a case where you can upgrade 35s to 40s and come out lighter. I don't think people realize how much larger of a tire that is. 32s to 35s is significant. 35s to 40s is a massive increase in the size of that tire. Especially considering you're probably going from something that is 12.5" wide to something at least 13.5" wide. Again, I say show me. Show me a 40" tire that you would put on this truck that is lighter than a common 35x12.5 tire like the Pro Comp AT Sport (68lbs each), BF Goodrich A/T KO2 (67lsbs), Goodyear Wrangle Duratrac (68lbs) or the Toyo Open Country AT II (68lbs). Those are probably the most popular ones I see. Other are, Nitto Terra Grappler G2 (72lbs), or the new Toyo Open Country A/T III (75lbs). These tire weights are based on an 18 rims. These are not even mud tires but All Terrain tires. If you look for 40" tires, you'll be extremely hard pressed to find an A/T tire. They are almost all M/T. If you look at mud tires the weight will be even more. I can't find a 40" tire less then 80lbs.
 

FullyGrounded

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This conversation was about already large truck tires. If you want to add rims to the conversation, OK. I'm still not buying it. We are not talking about tire and rim combos you can put on a car. They need to be able to handle a load and off-roading.

Show me a case where you can upgrade 35s to 40s and come out lighter. I don't think people realize how much larger of a tire that is. 32s to 35s is significant. 35s to 40s is a massive increase in the size of that tire. Especially considering you're probably going from something that is 12.5" wide to something at least 13.5" wide. Again, I say show me. Show me a 40" tire that you would put on this truck that is lighter than a common 35x12.5 tire like the Pro Comp AT Sport (68lbs each), BF Goodrich A/T KO2 (67lsbs), Goodyear Wrangle Duratrac (68lbs) or the Toyo Open Country AT II (68lbs). Those are probably the most popular ones I see. Other are, Nitto Terra Grappler G2 (72lbs), or the new Toyo Open Country A/T III (75lbs). These tire weights are based on an 18 rims. These are not even mud tires but All Terrain tires. If you look for 40" tires, you'll be extremely hard pressed to find an A/T tire. They are almost all M/T. If you look at mud tires the weight will be even more. I can't find a 40" tire less then 80lbs.
Hey Lance, what this was really... is, I'm not going to let someone that has no clue of my knowledge or skillset tell me what I can and cannot do with my CyberTruck. That's all. And, see... it ended, except for you.

In the end, I will do whatever I do. And, I expect that everyone will do the same. I opt for high end tech when it comes to my truck. Too, the CT is already built relatively high end. I like enough travel, enhanced significantly by better compression/rebound damping, and less unsprung weight. I like it to be able to go anywhere, do anything... then, what I do around my property, won't break it over the years of doing stupid. Does that make sense? To me it does, and that's good 'nuff. peace
 

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