Cybertruck Tire Size Options What Do You Choose?

Sirfun

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I was a boy scout long ago and the motto is "be prepared", I was in the Sierra Nevada mountains about 30 miles off on a dirt trail when I heard the tire let go. I had a good spare and it got me out to a car/truck tire shop where I did not know of it before. My tire was beyond repair. They showed the only tire in stock to replace it, he led me out back where on a rack in the weather it was stored securely. He gave the price which I had no choice of course and I asked him if there was an extra charge for the nail that was sticking through it, He laughed a little nervously and said that the reapair was free of charge.....I jumped at the only deal in the middle of nowhere. I still have on my Landrover as a spare and that was a very long time ago. If CT truck has no full size spare it would be on the top of my list as required gear before ever thinking of hitting the trail, Amen and pass the lug wrench.
I can depend on AAA for on-road repair and/or service. I pay for that convenience. After a few trips to the tip of Baja, it becomes obvious you need to plan for the worst and hope for the best when you go seeking adventure.





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If it makes it to production with 35s (and I think it will) and still is capable of 0-60 in 2.9 and 500+ miles of range, then I'll stick with 35s
Yes I will stick with 35s as well because I'm sure if you start messing with tire size height and width the way this thing is most likely to can be computerized you're going to start playing with fire
 

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Yes I will stick with 35s as well because I'm sure if you start messing with tire size height and width the way this thing is most likely to can be computerized you're going to start playing with fire
In current Tesla models you can enter in some tire/wheel information, but I am not sure how detailed it gets or what it does with that information. I have seen Tesla owners mention it.
 

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The Cybertruck is rated for 3500 ibs payload in the bed, This tire size has E or F load rating which enables the rated capacity, I think the dual motor has a 690 hp and the tri motor is 800 hp it requires a tire that can handle the load and power. For me I would like the tires on a 18" rim for more side wall, this will help with ride quality for bad roads. 35 inch tires have a potential to last longer ( less wheel revolutions per mile ) which would not hurt my pocket book so much. Tires in that classification are spendy.
Running air ride improves the ride quality, just hope the CT comes with different ride setting
The Cybertruck is rated for 3500 ibs payload in the bed, This tire size has E or F load rating which enables the rated capacity, I think the dual motor has a 690 hp and the tri motor is 800 hp it requires a tire that can handle the load and power. For me I would like the tires on a 18" rim for more side wall, this will help with ride quality for bad roads. 35 inch tires have a potential to last longer ( less wheel revolutions per mile ) which would not hurt my pocket book so much. Tires in that classification are spendy.
having air ride will improve the ride quality over conventional springs, so maybe less tyre wall will give a more controlled ride. Can’t wait to see what setting the CT will have out of the box. Being able to simply adjust the pressures by a few PSI is really handy for a difference of soft, medium or stiff ride.
 

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In current Tesla models you can enter in some tire/wheel information, but I am not sure how detailed it gets or what it does with that information. I have seen Tesla owners mention it.
That makes sense.... Well wait and see. Thanks.
 
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Running air ride improves the ride quality, just hope the CT comes with different ride setting

having air ride will improve the ride quality over conventional springs, so maybe less tyre wall will give a more controlled ride. Can’t wait to see what setting the CT will have out of the box. Being able to simply adjust the pressures by a few PSI is really handy for a difference of soft, medium or stiff ride.
Airbags in general yes can have a smoother ride but there are exceptions. Large diameter airbags around 10" and bigger have higher capacity rating but also have more volume and gives a smoother ride but smaller airbag maybe 6" can have a much harsher ride, the transportation authority that I used to work for had both of this size in buses they owned. On a particular series bus, on the front axle they use 4 each 6" airbags and the ride quality was horrible. Now a 6" airbag may work well on CT, we just don't know the size that Tesla will use but I trust them to make a great choice. Tesla cars ride very well according to owners. Since we are on the airbag subject, airbags have a life sort of like a tire. I can't tell you how long they last but I worked on buses for 26 years I can not begin to tell you how many airbags I have changed but they can fail besides wear out. I have a friend that told me his airbags in a GM suv ( I can't remember the model ) went out, I think it was less than 5 years old. I know this will come up for CT, I expect this to be part of the maintenance program.
As for tire aspect ratio for us in USA, I have owned cars from the 70's with 70/80 side wall ratio, I never thought the tires did not handle well, we drive well past 70 mph on older cars. New american cars run low profile tires. Older american cars are heavy with soft suspension yeah don't push it hard in corners. But the new cars like the last 10 years just about all of handle pretty good for stock. I personal drive rather slow compared to my fellow Montanans, I like to drive around 62mph ( 100kmh) so for me I don't think the CT will handle with any issues regardless of tire aspect ratio. The tires are rated for load E or F meaning the side wall will resist rolling the side wall under. I think the tires have a 8 ply sidewall rating which is a whole new subject. I am hoping the suspension will be completely adjustable by operator and not presets. I am older and I want nice ride.
 

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Isn't what matters the performance and life of the tires, not what the sidewalls look like?

What's wrong with hexagonal hubcaps?

-Crissa
I like the Hexagonal hubcaps on the Cybertruck. I also like the aero hubcaps on my Model 3 vs any wheel. I think the hubcaps are their for efficiency reasons and they look good. Same thing goes for the Model 3 Aero caps. My guess about the tire is Tesla will release a tire that is efficient as well as usefull...maybe something like a BF Goodrich KO2.
 

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Just so we are all talking the same thing: airbags used in suspension and air suspension are not the same thing, at least from what I understand Tesla has done and many assume will be doing.

Sandy Munro mentions how great the air system in the new Dodge Ram truck is...
 
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Just so we are all talking the same thing: airbags used in suspension and air suspension are not the same thing, at least from what I understand Tesla has done and many assume will be doing.

Sandy Munro mentions how great the air system in the new Dodge Ram truck is...
I am not sure of every type of air suspension there is but these are commonly used in automotive and for heavier loads air bellows are used. The pic below shows what CT may use in the front to maximize the space between the wheels for more interior or frunk space. Plus they can be made with the option to self level. I would think on the rear axel of CT a heavy duty type of air spring will be used in order to have a load capacity of 3500 lbs. No question in my mind the bellows are up to the task but Elon may have a better idea already.
Screenshot 2020-10-24 at 9.57.58 PM.png
 

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I am not sure of every type of air suspension there is but these are commonly used in automotive and for heavier loads air bellows are used. The pic below shows what CT may use in the front to maximize the space between the wheels for more interior or frunk space. Plus they can be made with the option to self level. I would think on the rear axel of CT a heavy duty type of air spring will be used in order to have a load capacity of 3500 lbs. No question in my mind the bellows are up to the task but Elon may have a better idea already.
These are the type of suspension I know people call air bags, common for add-on and some factory installed to help load leveling.
https://www.sdtrucksprings.com/inde...7KHWbdFRI1e4XZKK6DFpKP8jTParipnwaAoZ7EALw_wcB
 

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I would do everything humanly possible to put 40s under CT. When I look at it with 35s, it looks like the tire/wheel combo doesn't fit to the scale of the huge CT. To me, 40s will go a long way to resolving this dilema. peace
 

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I would do everything humanly possible to put 40s under CT. When I look at it with 35s, it looks like the tire/wheel combo doesn't fit to the scale of the huge CT. To me, 40s will go a long way to resolving this dilema. peace
I get that, but if I was going to do something like that, it would be for when I was going to do only off-roading. The hit to range will be substantial.

And, really, 35" would be big enough for a majority of things, I might never even bother with 40" tires.

Was it the 90s when the debate of 32 vs 35 was huge? Did it make sense to go to 35" tires and how good the 32" tires were getting... I think that happened in the 90s....
 
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I would do everything humanly possible to put 40s under CT. When I look at it with 35s, it looks like the tire/wheel combo doesn't fit to the scale of the huge CT. To me, 40s will go a long way to resolving this dilema. peace
A 40" tire may affect overall range on CT, also its ability to pull a trailer. Larger tires is like changing final drive ratio which reduces the torque to the wheels but if you don't plan on using CT for trailering not much concern. One thing that does not get mention is axle angles, CV joints have limitations I could not tell you what they are (Many types CV's) but
they have a design parameter. I used to work on Class 2 thru Class 8 trucks, once in a while a customer wanted to change the transmission of the truck to a automatic. We would have to change drive line to have less than 12 degree angle otherwise U joints can be stressed to the point of failure. A double U joint is considered a constant velocity joint. I had a friend that lifted his Ford truck to put 37' tires under his 4 wheel F250 truck. I looked at his truck and told him his driveline had too much angle, he did said it would be alright, that last about two days when the U joint failed on the way into work. I just thought I would share that story, it is something to consider when changing something so simple like a tire.
 

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A 40" tire may affect overall range on CT, also its ability to pull a trailer. Larger tires is like changing final drive ratio which reduces the torque to the wheels but if you don't plan on using CT for trailering not much concern. One thing that does not get mention is axle angles, CV joints have limitations I could not tell you what they are (Many types CV's) but
they have a design parameter. I used to work on Class 2 thru Class 8 trucks, once in a while a customer wanted to change the transmission of the truck to a automatic. We would have to change drive line to have less than 12 degree angle otherwise U joints can be stressed to the point of failure. A double U joint is considered a constant velocity joint. I had a friend that lifted his Ford truck to put 37' tires under his 4 wheel F250 truck. I looked at his truck and told him his driveline had too much angle, he did said it would be alright, that last about two days when the U joint failed on the way into work. I just thought I would share that story, it is something to consider when changing something so simple like a tire.
Yes, a larger tire will reduce low speed torque; however, range will likely be enhanced. Consider, a larger tire has a greater circumference. This greater circumference, when rotated one time, results in a longer distance traveled than a smaller tire with lesser circumference. At speed, the effort to turn this larger wheel (tire), vs the effort to turn the smaller wheel approaches 0.
 

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Yes, a larger tire will reduce low speed torque; however, range will likely be enhanced. Consider, a larger tire has a greater circumference. This greater circumference, when rotated one time, results in a longer distance traveled than a smaller tire with lesser circumference. At speed, the effort to turn this larger wheel (tire), vs the effort to turn the smaller wheel approaches 0.
A larger tire is heavier, more spinning mass, thus harder to spin. Also, bigger tire means a larger contact patch, which means more rolling resistance.

Oh, and the truck will sit up taller, so more frontal area...

That is why I think a larger tire could mean a shorter range.
 

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