Driving the Cybertruck

TyPope

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I disagree. I love it that the car comes to a complete stop and now I count on it. I agree about the nosediving...you do have to get used to driving an EV including how to stop accelerating, etc.
I agree. Once at a stop, you can relax your feet off the pedal while sitting still. In creep mode, you have to keep a foot on the brake to keep from moving. It can be quite relaxing in heavy traffic to not have to keep nursing that brake pedal.
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TyPope

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Interesting. I've driven cars with all braking through the friction brake and cars with regen controlled via a single thrust pedal but never one with regen controlled via two pedals so I can't say whether I would prefer that or rather learn to prefer that as I really like the single pedal. I assume they have considered whether it will drive prospective buyers away. I guess they can always claim in their advertising that it is superior in some way.
I regularly drive a Prius and my wife's MY... I MUCH prefer single pedal drive, not that that matters to anyone as it's just my opinion. The Prius, when lightly applying the brake (not "break", people... ), it goes into regen. If you hold the same pressure, you can feel the regen get more and more aggressive. Eventually, the friction brakes kick in. If you hit the brake hard enough, the friction brakes engage along with the regen to slow you down in a hurry.

The ONLY gripe I have with Tesla's single pedal drive is that it goes from about 2 mph to zero WAY too slow. I actually stop at stop signs. I know, "gasp!". Anyway, I come to complete stops due to an event that happened a long time ago and I swore I'd never be THAT guy. So, waiting for the MY to come to a complete stop is agonizing at times. I'm thinking "Alright, stop already!".
 

CyberG

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I think regen is limited to 60kh across the Tesla lineup, unless my older MS is outdated. That’s about half of the Gen 2 supercharging speed. If the CT is similarly limited then it won’t slow you down as quickly because of the added momentum of the heavier vehicle. Perhaps they will increase the Kh limit regen rate for the CT, but that puts extra wear and tear on the batteries. I suspect it will be the same, so you may need to release a bit earlier for the stop sign. I just had the brakes replaced on my S at 65k miles, but for the last 10k I had regen on low thinking I might get more mileage out of my rear tires (I have a rwd p85+). Needless to say it didn’t have any appreciable impact on wear of the tires, so I’m back on normal regen and just have to live with new rears every 11 months.
 

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I think regen is limited to 60kh across the Tesla lineup, unless my older MS is outdated. That’s about half of the Gen 2 supercharging speed. If the CT is similarly limited then it won’t slow you down as quickly because of the added momentum of the heavier vehicle.
The battery power for acceleration/decellaration is P = m*a*v where v is the speed and a the acceleration. The CT is going to be heavier (larger m) and, thus for commensurate (or actually better) acceleration the batteries are going to have to provide more power. This is realized by installing bigger batteries and we know that this will be the case with the TriMotor.

The formula doesn't say whether a is restricted to positive acceleration and it is not (or regen would not work). Just as the larger battery can deliver more power it can absorb more power. Regen will scale.


Perhaps they will increase the Kh limit regen rate for the CT, but that puts extra wear and tear on the batteries.
let's say the MS can safely discharge at 1.5C and recharge at 0.65C (the power meter indicates an appreciably larger number for discharge limit than it does for charge). If we go to a heavier car that required twice the power but install a battery with double the C the discharge rate is still 1.5C. Doubling the allowable charge rate still gives us 0.65C. The battery is not more stressed.

Think if it this way. A second battery is installed in parallel with the original one. The motors take the double the current and the batteries deliver that but each battery delivers half of the total i.e. what it did in the smaller car. Similarly in braking twice the current is produced but it is divided between the two batteries.
 
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MUSK007

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I agree. Once at a stop, you can relax your feet off the pedal while sitting still. In creep mode, you have to keep a foot on the brake to keep from moving. It can be quite relaxing in heavy traffic to not have to keep nursing that brake pedal.


The first thing they teach you in driving school is to keep your foot on the break and your wheels straight at a stop light. For safety reasons. If someone hits you from behind you do to want to be shot Forward and hit somebody or turn into oncoming traffic. That’s why you use creep mode. For safety.

if you drive a stick shift manual trans car you don’t sit at a stoplight in neutral without using the brake pedal.

Furthermore without creep mode on, if you are on a hill you will roll forward or backwards just like in a stick shift.

Come on folks. Think safety so you Tesla won’t be in the shop for a month because you failed to drive safely
 

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Not sure if the right category, but I want to ask about driving the truck. My current habits might seem strange to some. I try to not use the brake, ever. I am only partly successful. Using the brake is a sign of defeat. All that energy to gain momentum and you just put it into waste heat in a conventional truck. So I lag in traffic (I am sure some hate me) so I do not have to brake often, if at all. A good trip is where I use a brake only once. So my question is do i have to change these habits with the CT? It does have regenerative braking, so am I saving nothing by forgoing the brake petal? Will other drivers like me more now?
I don’t even know you but I love you 🤣
 

Crissa

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The first thing they teach you in driving school is...
No, it's not.

Because in a manual, if you're in gear or have the parking brake in place, it's pointless to leave your foot on the pedal. Worse, if the car is impacted, there's no real guarantee your human body will remain able to hold that pedal position.

And it's also not because I remember driving class and asking about what I was supposed to do with an automatic (since I was learning on a manual) and leaving my foot on the brake was not anywhere in the instructions.

if you drive a stick shift manual trans car you don’t sit at a stoplight in neutral without using the brake pedal.
Why would you leave your foot on the brake? The car isn't going anywhere. If the car is in neutral, put the parking brake on. You shouldn't leave the car in neutral if you're not using the parking brake. If the car isn't in neutral, you should actively have your feet on the pedals controlling the friction zone and motion of the car.

-Crissa
 

MUSK007

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Well... you can lead a horse to water....
 

Jimo

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Not sure if the right category, but I want to ask about driving the truck. My current habits might seem strange to some. I try to not use the brake, ever. I am only partly successful. Using the brake is a sign of defeat. All that energy to gain momentum and you just put it into waste heat in a conventional truck. So I lag in traffic (I am sure some hate me) so I do not have to brake often, if at all. A good trip is where I use a brake only once. So my question is do i have to change these habits with the CT? It does have regenerative braking, so am I saving nothing by forgoing the brake petal? Will other drivers like me more now?
The only downside is when the battery is full and no regen braking.
 

Cybr on

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Well... you can lead a horse to water....
Are you suggesting that because you cannot make a horse drink water that now it’s not possible?

I’m confused, cuz I just made my horse drink. All I did
was give him a little salt.
😜
 
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