Is the folded exoskeleton actually easy to manufacture

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Tinker71

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Batteries in the frame, interesting...
Yes, the roof peak definitely, both lateral sides and more importantly the cargo structure I believe will be a full frame, it needs to withstand 3500lbs of load
I think we are really saying mostly the same thing. The roof rails are essentially a box beam in a complex shape. They may need to be thicker than 3 mm. The battery compartment is also a box beam. The lid to the battery compartment might be considered the flange with the battery being the web. The CT basically forms a triangle, which is a very efficient section the whole truck is a truss. I am so pumped about the shape.
 

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The 3mm exoskeleton will be spot welded to a thinner, softer stainless steel which is stamped into the needed shapes for the inner frame, door frames. It's not all 3mm thru and thru. It's really nothing like the Delorean, which was a thin skin of malleable SS shafted on a fiberglass structure, and a steel frame under that. So to answer the question, I think it'll be much easier than other vehicles, as it'll be largely automated, with no paint shop. Score, bend, weld, spot weld, next. I still think Elon is going to make it happen by late 2021, even if he has to get out on the production floor himself, again.
Cyberframe.jpg
This is funny seeing all the conversation about how a manufacturer will be able to accomplish what they said they're gonna do. Generally it's a wait and see proposition.

Being a retired Sheet Metal Worker I do have some knowledge of working with SS. Cyberman, I agree with you. There will be different gauge/density's of SS used. I could easily see them using light gauge material to stamp those door frames. Even though they're different density they can be welded together. You just have to apply more heat to the heavier material. The 3mm outside material on the outside is heavier gauge than anything we ever used at any shops I worked for, that's extremely thick. But, if you have a factory set up with machinery/robotics to cut and bend it, I would think it would be like Sandy Munro said, faster and cheaper to do, than stamping aluminum and painting it.
 

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This is funny seeing all the conversation about how a manufacturer will be able to accomplish what they said they're gonna do. Generally it's a wait and see proposition.
#armchairQuarterbacks

Being a retired Sheet Metal Worker I do have some knowledge of working with SS. Cyberman, I agree with you. There will be different gauge/density's of SS used. I could easily see them using light gauge material to stamp those door frames. Even though they're different density they can be welded together. You just have to apply more heat to the heavier material. The 3mm outside material on the outside is heavier gauge than anything we ever used at any shops I worked for, that's extremely thick. But, if you have a factory set up with machinery/robotics to cut and bend it, I would think it would be like Sandy Munro said, faster and cheaper to do, than stamping aluminum and painting it.
Stupid question from ignorance: Can you cast SS? Like in a giant casting machine? Just saying....
 

johnm6875

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#armchairQuarterbacks



Stupid question from ignorance: Can you cast SS? Like in a giant casting machine? Just saying....
Yes, but requires lots of heat and does not lend itself to large scale manufacturing.
I'm hoping for front and rear injection "mega castings" using aluminum alloy (like in the MY) attached to an 4680 battery pack attached under the SS exoskeleton with stamped aluminum and SS everywhere else (no paint anywhere). Tesla/SpaceX have lots of experience with all the materials and processes except SS folding. I have confidence they'll figure it out.
 

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On the question of a frame, I tend to think not from what Elon himself has said. He stated that they decided to use the battery and it's container as a stressed frame member (maybe in the Model X or Y), to add rigidity and structure. And, even saying that other manufacturers that aren't doing this are missing the benefit of this structure. I think he believes so wholly in this, that the bottom frame will be the battery/box, and the rest of the exoskeleton will be the exterior frame. It can also be further buttressed by boxed and triangled SS and more.

My hope, for an offroad capable truck, they don't rely on just 3mm of SS to stop sharp boulders and protrusions, from damaging the battery through this plating. Even if it had 1/8" gap for the plate to deflect, between the bottom plate and battery box, it would be immensely safer for the battery, and your ability to get home afterwards, regardless of what you encountered.

Something I love about the way Elon builds things - they are simple as possible. This means, you won't have to remove 40 parts to access the motor. You won't have 20 wires and hoses in the way, to do something simple. I expect, everything that is necessary, will have it's place, and it will be a whole lot less than we're used to seeing under a hood, or in the underbody.
 

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Tesla was able to get the largest casting machine in the world to work, this had to of been extremely difficult... I am confident they can figure out how to automate folding SS panels..
 

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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">Bending 12mm (0.472441”) inox sheet.<br>📱<a href="https://t.co/VMhXkSI0pL">https://t.co/VMhXkSI0pL</a> <a href="https://t.co/cDYWHJm61z">pic.twitter.com/cDYWHJm61z</a></p>&mdash; World of Engineering (@engineers_feed) <a href="">November 22, 2020</a></blockquote> <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
the guitar builder in me is jealous they can do that without steam.....😎😆
 

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#armchairQuarterbacks



Stupid question from ignorance: Can you cast SS? Like in a giant casting machine? Just saying....
No such thing as a stupid question. Yes Stainless can be cast. It really is gonna be a wait and see process, on how Tesla get's er done.
 

Cyber1qhorsey

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Another question. If an accident is energetic enough to bend a SS fender where will the metal actually fail? The posts? Something else? For repairs, would one cut out the failure point and weld a segment or panel in?
 

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The weight of a 12mm exoskeleton would probably mean that the CT would no longer float. LOL
Oh, I was just thinking I would use it for a bunker at that point, not actually drive it anywhere. :ROFLMAO:
 

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Another question. If an accident is energetic enough to bend a SS fender where will the metal actually fail?
Where the failure points in the crumple zone have been placed. It being so strong, it will probably be much more organized than we're used to.

For repairs, would one cut out the failure point and weld a segment or panel in?
Yes. That's in fact the method of repairing the Model Y with the new mega-castings. The crash bars are part of the casting, but designed to be sacrificed and replaced.

That's why I said on a Cybertruck, crash damage will be interesting. You won't be able to just hide it under paint.

-Crissa
 
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