Car designer Frank Stephenson's view on the Cybertruck

First Name
James
Joined
Jun 19, 2020
Messages
24
Reaction score
20
Location
Wheeling, WV
Vehicles
F-150
Occupation
retired
Country flag
This designer says he doesn't like the utilitarian and brutal design of the Cybertruck. I love it. It's a freakin' truck, for chrissakes. The Buick body curves would be double the cost to manufacture. I am not sure I would want to take the Buick off road.





Advertisement

 

Wildfortune

Member
First Name
Denise
Joined
Apr 9, 2020
Messages
9
Reaction score
27
Location
Maine, USA
Vehicles
Ordered Tri-motor C/T to replace my Ford Edge
Occupation
Retired to a Hobby Farm
Country flag
Elon had me at Exoskeleton! No further explanations needed nor wants unfulfilled.
Admittedly I did go through the 7 stages of acceptance and delayed ordering until day 2.5.

Ct stages of acceptance.jpg
 

Rockvillerich

Active member
First Name
Richard
Joined
May 18, 2020
Messages
28
Reaction score
20
Location
Rockville MD
Vehicles
Cybertruck, tri-motor, and dual motor.
Occupation
Machine fabrication
Country flag
I thought this was very interesting so I thought I would share. I see his points, don't agree with them all of course. It's interesting to see what someone who is very successful at car design thinks about something so polarizing though.

Who really cares all that much what such a functional and durable vehicles looks like? The CT isn't for everyone, only those that appreciate true engineering genius.
 

Clinicalfixer

New member
First Name
David Brown
Joined
Nov 20, 2020
Messages
1
Reaction score
0
Location
Rosedale MD
Vehicles
Model X, S
Occupation
Clinical Engineer
Country flag
Strange... I don't want any of the cars this guy designed.
DITTO! He doesn’t understand why the CT is shaped this way, functionality, buildability and it makes those who don’t understand jealous.
 

David R Kirkpatrick

Well-known member
First Name
David
Joined
Dec 18, 2019
Messages
78
Reaction score
77
Location
Shady New York
Vehicles
2019 P100S, Cybertruck ordered
Occupation
Retired
Country flag
I thought this was very interesting so I thought I would share. I see his points, don't agree with them all of course. It's interesting to see what someone who is very successful at car design thinks about something so polarizing though.

Odd comparison of apples and oranges. No mention of functionality because there is no comparison. Neither of the saloons could carry a load of lumber, go off road, house a full sized bed, or tow anything. My feeling just with regard to design is that the enduring design of the ultra futuristic car he shows (Careem sp?) is the true heritage of the CT that will look futuristic in decades to come. The other car he shows is ignorably predictable.
 

CybrGator

New member
Joined
Dec 8, 2019
Messages
4
Reaction score
5
Location
North Carolina
Vehicles
2017 Ford F-150, 2017 Mazda CX-9, 2018 Ford Escape
Country flag
I thought this was very interesting so I thought I would share. I see his points, don't agree with them all of course. It's interesting to see what someone who is very successful at car design thinks about something so polarizing though.

I couldn't care less about his design pedigree or what he designed in the past. The Cybertruck was love at first sight for me and I know exactly where my 80k will be spent approximately a year from now 🤠
 

Delusional

Well-known member
First Name
Phil
Joined
Dec 5, 2019
Messages
112
Reaction score
166
Location
Pittsburgh
Vehicles
F-150
Occupation
Construction
Country flag
This guy is scared and covering his own ass.
He sees engineers taking over his design turf and instantly everything he "knows" about car design is thrown right out the window, He knows that the Cybrtrk's folded-steel method of producing vehicle bodies may prove to be far cheaper and at the same time far stronger than his designs. If the advantages of the Cybrtrk method are adopted by more in the industry, suddenly he's the one who appears out of date. Therefore he is forced to defend everything he has done in his entire career as being "right", and attack anything that does not follow his principles as being "wrong". It's simple self-preservation.

It's the engineers taking over design that really rubs him raw. He cannot sit still for that and I believe is the true motivation for creating his review.

And he's way outside his niche. Why should a Ferrari and McClaren designer care in the slightest about a pickup truck. The design language does not translate between the two.
He has no clue of the concerns of a truck buyer, and his short video emphasizes that.
I doubt he's ever driven the truck that carries his cars from show to show.

Ferarris are overloaded if you bring an extra pair of sunglasses.
 

cybercamper

Member
First Name
Juliana
Joined
Nov 9, 2020
Messages
18
Reaction score
16
Location
Denver Colorado USA
Vehicles
Cybertruck dual motor
Occupation
Student
Country flag
For me, the most worrisome design feature is the exoskeleton. Lotus tried a lightweight fiberglass exoskeleton in 1966 with the Europa S1 and they quickly ran away from it for the S2:

" The most significant change was the switch from fully bonded construction to the use of bolt fasteners to attach the fibreglass body to the backbone steel frame. While reducing the torsional and flexural stiffneses somewhat, the use of a separable body was welcomed by the automotive insurance industry as it greatly reduced the complexity and cost of making repairs to the vehicle.[3] " You could easily total an S1 in a minor accident.

However, I believe that if Lotus had been using 3mm stainless steel, the design would have succeeded. It would have been many times stronger, although much heavier. Perfect for a truck, maybe not for a sportscar. Note the Cybertruck has sail pillars just like the Europa S1.
1607980972240.png


An interesting side note is that the other mass market stainless car design (DeLorean) had to be rescued by Lotus. In order to stamp the body panels, the stainless had to be very thin, too thin in fact for a car. Lotus helped DeLorean reinforce the panels with fiberglass just to make them strong enough. Since Tesla has had a long relationship with Lotus, all this history must have been well known and informed the Cybertuck design. Hence origami.

OK one more side note: The Europa S2 got rid of the sail pillars, as did the 1977 Lancia Montecarlo, because of rearward visibility concerns.

1976 Montecarlo:
1607997050861.png

1977 Montecarlo with glass sail pillars/flying buttresses:
1607997025317.png


Europa S2:
1607997292779.png
 

braddibbnd

Active member
First Name
Brad
Joined
May 1, 2020
Messages
33
Reaction score
68
Location
North Dakota
Vehicles
13 Ram, 18 Jeep Cherokee
Occupation
Retired
Country flag
Thats a very pretty design but I can't imagine looking over that hood and judging the front distance.
Well if you've ever driven a Chevrolet Lumina APV or Pontiac Trans Sport, you would know that GM cares not about the front distance viewing. The company I worked for in the 90s bought those POS's and they were all around terrible(except maybe the seats).
As far as an exotic car/plane designer, I don't want to waste much time on what he has to say. I'm ecstatic about the design and can't wait to get my hands on a CT. Don't care about what other concept artist have to show either. They are suppose to give an updated look at the changes they've made sometime this month and then we can wonder about the options available on final order.
 

Cyberman

Well-known member
First Name
Adam
Joined
Apr 7, 2020
Messages
508
Reaction score
825
Location
San Diego
Vehicles
F150,F550, Escape
Occupation
Cybercontractor
Country flag
Elon had me at Exoskeleton! No further explanations needed nor wants unfulfilled.
Admittedly I did go through the 7 stages of acceptance and delayed ordering until day 2.5.

Ct stages of acceptance.jpg
This is perfect!
It took me about two days to cycle from 1 through 7, hence my place at 216,000 in line. But yes, in the words of Bonanno Pisano, "It's -a-perfect!
 
Last edited:

Cybercarlson

Well-known member
First Name
T.C.
Joined
Jun 3, 2020
Messages
82
Reaction score
118
Location
Germany
Vehicles
chevy K1500 decades ago, Suzuki GJ 74, VW T-5,BUG,
Country flag
For me, the most worrisome design feature is the exoskeleton.
Thank you Juliana for this gem from the past.👏

Like so often (in Automotive) what seems to be something new (sail pilars) is not, it just has been forgotten.

"The third time is a charm "?? Or how does the saying go.....

btw. electric opening of the side pilar lids sould be standart..... how about a "Batmode" flapping them ? 🦇🦇
 

DarinCT

Well-known member
First Name
Darin
Joined
Dec 16, 2020
Messages
206
Reaction score
317
Location
California
Vehicles
M3, CT triM
Country flag
For me, the most worrisome design feature is the exoskeleton. Lotus tried a lightweight fiberglass exoskeleton in 1966 with the Europa S1 and they quickly ran away from it for the S2:

" The most significant change was the switch from fully bonded construction to the use of bolt fasteners to attach the fibreglass body to the backbone steel frame. While reducing the torsional and flexural stiffneses somewhat, the use of a separable body was welcomed by the automotive insurance industry as it greatly reduced the complexity and cost of making repairs to the vehicle.[3] " You could easily total an S1 in a minor accident.

However, I believe that if Lotus had been using 3mm stainless steel, the design would have succeeded. It would have been many times stronger, although much heavier. Perfect for a truck, maybe not for a sportscar. Note the Cybertruck has sail pillars just like the Europa S1.
1607980972240.png


An interesting side note is that the other mass market stainless car design (DeLorean) had to be rescued by Lotus. In order to stamp the body panels, the stainless had to be very thin, too thin in fact for a car. Lotus helped DeLorean reinforce the panels with fiberglass just to make them strong enough. Since Tesla has had a long relationship with Lotus, all this history must have been well known and informed the Cybertuck design. Hence origami.

OK one more side note: The Europa S2 got rid of the sail pillars, as did the 1977 Lancia Montecarlo, because of rearward visibility concerns.

1976 Montecarlo:
1607997050861.png

1977 Montecarlo with glass sail pillars/flying buttresses:
1607997025317.png


Europa S2:
1607997292779.png
(First post here). I'm thinking that the issue of torsion, as well as compression, extension, flexion and shear, forced the use of exoskeleton. Then, they leaned into it. This is backwards from a car designer's perspective. A car designer can say unibody and let's make something. Tesla has to say, "How do we insure the battery pack doesn't take large quantities of force while carrying a load in the bed or towing???".

Traditional body on frame and unibody won't support the towing and carrying while protecting the battery pack from the torsion and other forces.

How does Tesla do that? exoskeleton, that's good because then they can skip paint and save billions...ok...what's the most sturdy way to do it? single high point triangle. The Tesla look continues inside given the engineering and design constraints . It's almost as if the CyberTruck had to look this way for it to even work.

Personally, the only thing that they could have gotten wrong, they did. That steering wheel, ugh...
 

Advertisement





 


Advertisement
Top