Home charging Cybertruck using Tesla Mobile Wall connector?

Crissa

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You need 74 kWh to go from 20% to 80% in a Cybertruck, not subtracting 5-10% for inefficiencies, so call it 80 kWh. At only 32 amps, that will take ten and a half hours, assuming no energy used to heat the battery. If you have the full 48 amps available, that shortens to only seven and a half hours. For people who might arrive home at 9 pm and who want to leave at 6 am with 80% that will make a big difference in being able to do that. What if you arrive home from the big city at midnight and have a full day following? With only 32 amps you are out of luck; you will be stopping at a Supercharger to fill up on electrons costing twice as much to four times as much!
...That's a stupid long day.

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Outdoors

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I like using the mobile connector from time to time. Yet I have purchased a few wall connectors for out of town friends and family. Never thought it as future proofing, but just makes me visit them more often. Yet now with NACS I am sure they are just as happy as I was at install.

I don't get into things like this often. Yet some rules I have always found and followed.

Ask and look, and never assume with electricity. It never hurts. Alternative might.
Don't use your car as an amp limiter for poor electrical runs. One can never count on it.
If you use someone else's electricity try to, or pay for it. Don't be a Cheapskate.
 

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I believe that the 120v may be better for your battery at 15amps as opposed to quickly filling the battery using a wall charger at 48amps.
Typically for lithium batteries they do better with a slow charge opposed to a fast one.
So assuming you daily charge to 80% and don't drive much so you don't need the range I believe using a 120v charger and 10-15amps is going to be better for the overall health of the battery. Same logic applies to home charging at lower amps is better than frequently supercharging.
On a normal 15 amp circuit you can only pull 12 amps continously. So that 1.44 kw. In a pack the size of tesla or any EV for that matter 1.44 kw or even 7 or 15 kilowatts is literally nothing. It's not even 1C. Trust me it's doing more harm then good. But you'll probably not see the effects in your lifetime with the car. Except higher Power bill.
 

Gigahorse

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On a normal 15 amp circuit you can only pull 12 amps continously. So that 1.44 kw. In a pack the size of tesla or any EV for that matter 1.44 kw or even 7 or 15 kilowatts is literally nothing. It's not even 1C. Trust me it's doing more harm then good. But you'll probably not see the effects in your lifetime with the car. Except higher Power bill.
Interesting, most of the high mileage long term owner Teslas I have seen have used the mobile wall connectors and charged at low rate of speed.

Unsure the logic of 10Amp mobile charger vs 48Amp other than the battery heating up quickly with the 48Amp. I don't think there would be additional electricity lost on a slow charge via a fast chart, and assuming car is stored inside which most are a slow 10A should result in less pack heat than a 48A charge?
 


cgladue

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Interesting, most of the high mileage long term owner Teslas I have seen have used the mobile wall connectors and charged at low rate of speed.

Unsure the logic of 10Amp mobile charger vs 48Amp other than the battery heating up quickly with the 48Amp. I don't think there would be additional electricity lost on a slow charge via a fast chart, and assuming car is stored inside which most are a slow 10A should result in less pack heat than a 48A charge?
Back when i actually went to the office and i level 1 charged:
Tesla Cybertruck Home charging Cybertruck using Tesla Mobile Wall connector? 1711629601593-or


when i am home level 2 charging:
Tesla Cybertruck Home charging Cybertruck using Tesla Mobile Wall connector? 1711629640225-2q


level 1 charging is more wasteful,

lets just assume the thermal system (pumps, heatpump, pack heater, etc) consumes 500 watts, that is 500 watts not going into the battery. Example math:

16 amps x 120 = 1,920 - 500 = 1,420 charging watts 74% efficient

16 amps x 240 = 3,840 - 500 = 3,340 charging watts 87% efficient
 

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Back when i actually went to the office and i level 1 charged:
1711629601593-or.png


when i am home level 2 charging:
1711629640225-2q.png


level 1 charging is more wasteful,

lets just assume the thermal system (pumps, heatpump, pack heater, etc) consumes 500 watts, that is 500 watts not going into the battery. Example math:

16 amps x 120 = 1,920 - 500 = 1,420 charging watts 74% efficient

16 amps x 240 = 3,840 - 500 = 3,340 charging watts 87% efficient
True, the consumption from pumps, pack heater in cold, etc has a running cost. Wonder what that efficiency difference over the lifetime of the battery would cost in efficiency loss vs pack wear and tear charging at a higher amperage.
 

Woodrick

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Interesting, most of the high mileage long term owner Teslas I have seen have used the mobile wall connectors and charged at low rate of speed.

Unsure the logic of 10Amp mobile charger vs 48Amp other than the battery heating up quickly with the 48Amp. I don't think there would be additional electricity lost on a slow charge via a fast chart, and assuming car is stored inside which most are a slow 10A should result in less pack heat than a 48A charge?
The Teslas that have the highest mileage do nothing but Supercharge, multiple times per day.
 

Techy Golfer

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Came here to get some feedback on upgrading my existing 50amp line to a 60amp during my PowerShare install if the additional cost is only $600.

I put 46k miles on my 2018 3 in 6 years so don’t see charging speed being a huge driver although when I’m busy it’s great to get a quick boost and peace of mind.
Main logic for considering the upgrade is future proof and additional amperage for a power outage.
 

HUH

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I have two mobile charger, one from 2019 MS, one from CT.
  • With the old MS one : I got 48 AMP on MS, 32 AMP on CT
  • with the shining new one: I got 32 AMP on both MS and CT
BTW, the one with CT, it is sealed, but looks like used before
 


Jhodgesatmb

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I have two mobile charger, one from 2019 MS, one from CT.
  • With the old MS one : I got 48 AMP on MS, 32 AMP on CT
  • with the shining new one: I got 32 AMP on both MS and CT
BTW, the one with CT, it is sealed, but looks like used before
I have a V3 for the CT with a 60-amp breaker and a Universal for the MY with a 50-amp breaker. The former is getting 48 amps on the CT. The latter gets 40.
 

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FWIW I had a Hummer EV and now I have the Cyberbeast. I have only ever charged either with the mobile connector on a 110v 20a outlet in my garage (shared with the deep freezer). If I have a "big mile day" I have to back my truck into the garage as the 240v 40a outlet is on the other side so it's an option but rarely needed. I do have the wall connector (brand new and still in the box) that came with my Hummer and would eventually like to install a Tesla wall connector but so far the mobile adapter has been fine for me (but I don't drive many miles per day).

There is an issue with the Tesla mobile connector that I've noticed however...

I've been having a problem charging with said mobile charger. I've only ever charged my truck with this mobile charger on a 20A 110v outlet in my garage. Whenever I park my truck and get out and plug in the charger, the icon turns blue and that's it. NO CHARGING.

I try to turn on charging in the mobile app or on the truck itself and the option isn't available. The charge plug itself is fully seated and locked but the icon remains blue and charger is locked. I try turning off bluetooth so the truck thinks I'm not around and I get the same thing.

Now if I walk away and ignore the truck for a few minutes, and then go back out and turn on bluetooth and wake the truck and THEN plug in the mobile charger, it MIGHT start charging. This isn't consistent however as I might have to do this a couple times. It's getting frustrating having to go through this rigamarole every time I want to charge it.

Things I've considered:

1) I don't have a schedule set or a departure time set. I don't have it set to charge only on off peak hours.

2) Maybe I missed something in the instructions. Nope. Read them about 20 times.

3) I cannot find a repeatable method to get it to work consistently. Eventually it does seem to start charging, but it's not without several attempts and usually involves leaving the truck sit for a few minutes.
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